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I have just started working at company A, that uses company's B product. Some time after that i received an offer from company B for salary 2x that i was promised at company A after my test period of 3 months.

Situation is puzzling. I will read my agreement carefully, but if there are no legal limitations in such case, is it ok for me to jump to that other company? Location of the company B is also more convenient for me.

Also at company A i can work more relaxed, using older tech and with not pressure on the quality of work, what i doubt will be a case with company B.

And should i share this info with my colleagues in company A?

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  • Did you apply to company A and B at the same time? – sf02 Oct 15 '20 at 18:52
  • What good would come out of sharing the information? – Helena Oct 15 '20 at 18:54
  • Are you saying that Company B is offering twice what Company A said they'd raise your salary to, or that they said that after Company B's probation they'd give you a salary that's twice what Company A is offering you now? Also, how much do you care about that pressure? Is the pressure a good thing or a bad thing? – Ben Barden Oct 15 '20 at 19:07
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    it is all about the WRITTEN, SIGNED OFFER FROM B. there is no other issue at hand here. – Fattie Oct 15 '20 at 19:43
  • @Fattie Actually no, it's also about it being a competitor (as said in the title). I'd be VERY careful about any competition-related agreement in the contract that's already signed. – ChatterOne Oct 16 '20 at 6:34
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if there are no legal limitations in such case, is it ok for me to jump to that other company

Yes of course.

No need to "jump". Just change jobs.

at company A i can work more relaxed...

Please "don't be silly". Double your salary.

should i share this info with my colleagues in company A

Say nothing to anyone.

Next step:

Tell the new company "thanks!" and ask them for the written offer with start date.

Enjoy.

Be aware that you explain nothing and give no reasons whatsoever. Say nothing.

As discussed 10,000 times on this site (endless examples), when you leave company A you tell them nothing.

This is triply-true since you are only probation'ing the company to see if you like them.

As with any time you resign, politely state that you are leaving and that's it.

  1. Do not say why you are leaving.

  2. Do not mention money ever at all.

  3. Do not say what you are doing next.

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  • Why is mentioning money so bad? They might agree to pay you 2x your salary if you make it clear that salary is the main reason you are switching jobs. – Wais Kamal Oct 16 '20 at 18:39
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Take the offer that values your contribution more, and yes, its okay to jump during your test period (probation), that is what probation is for, you decide whether you like your new job or not. Also, do not share that info with colleagues in company A because they have no use for it.

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Your company makes decisions based on business calculations so it's perfectly fair for you to do the same. It's simple math in this case. As far as your concern about how working at company A is easier ("i can work more relaxed, using older tech and with not pressure on the quality of work"). That will cause problems for you years later on when you want to switch companies or get laid off and find out your skills aren't competitive enough to (easily) find work.

And should i share this info with my colleagues in company A?

No. The only issue I can see is if you signed an NDA or a trial period agreement that says you owe money if you want to get out of that. If company B really wants you they won't mind buying out your contract obligations from company A. You need to talk about that with company B to make sure there's no obstacles.

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