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I am a new grad and I recently got a full-time job at a large company. I signed a written offer and went through a background check and drug test. I got an email from HR that I passed them and I am ready to start. Since it's my first time getting a full-time job and I don't know much about the process, I was wondering what to do for the remaining 3 weeks before I start working. Would it be necessary or appropriate to touch base with my manager before the starting date? When do employees usually get to sign hiring documents like insurance or w-4 form?

p.s) I know it's best to ask HR, but since I got no response from HR for 3 days and I didn't want to urge them. Also, I wanted to check online :)

Thanks

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    Usually all this stuff (plus some training, other paperwork, etc) is done on your first day/week/month (depends on the company rules) unless HR or your manager contacts you before start date and ask you to sign something/meet/etc. And if there is going to be a need to do so they would definitely let you know. So don't sweat everything is going to be fine. Just enjoy your three weeks. – AlexanderM Oct 23 '20 at 2:54
  • If you have THREE WEEKS, look for a better job with more money! :ppp – Fattie Oct 23 '20 at 13:04
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With a few exceptions in some industries, there isn't really much you need to do. If they need you to sign forms/documents before your first day, they will get into contact with you. Otherwise, you should make sure you take to your first day, any information that you may need to use to fill out forms.

I would refrain from getting into contact with your future manager, unless HR have told you to do so.

You should probably just spend three weeks relaxing because, while exciting, the first few weeks may take some adjusting. Only other thing I would do is make sure I understand the dress code and make sure I have suitable clothes ready to go (though don't go overboard - you may have to adapt after the first week when the real dress code becomes apparent).

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  • Yes, you don't need to do anything except congratulate yourself on landing your first job. – Kilisi Oct 23 '20 at 6:15
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    Some other suggestions in your last week(s): try to adjust your schedule to the new work-routine (waking up on time, ...) - if you don't know the area too well, do a trial run or 2 for your commute around the time you would actually be going to/coming from work - check with HR or your manager if you need to bring lunch/a computer/... for the first day - check on COVID-19 measures! - get as much open chores/errands out of the way now that you have some free time (overdue dentist appointment/get your car serviced/...) – AsheraH Oct 23 '20 at 9:08
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I was wondering what to do for the remaining 3 weeks before I start working.

Enjoy yourself. Clear off any chores that need doing, but otherwise relax. Be prepared to hit the ground running once you start your new job.

Would it be necessary or appropriate to touch base with my manager before the starting date?

If you have questions that need answering before you start (such as what time to arrive the first day, etc.), you discuss them with your manager or HR. Otherwise, there's no need to touch base.

When do employees usually get to sign hiring documents like insurance or w-4 form?

Those forms are usually handled during your first day/week of work as part of the normal onboarding process. You may need to bring several forms of identification. Sometimes you need to bring a cancelled check to start the direct deposit process for your paycheck. HR will walk you through all that.

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I agree with the other answers that during the remaining free weeks you should mainly relax. Also don't contact your future manager unless you have been asked/told to do so.

However I think there are some small few things you could to prepare.

  • If after preparing for the job interview and the job interview itself, it still is not entirely clear what your future company exactly does and how they earn their money (happened to me once), you could study this a bit on the company website or other resources.
  • You could study some of the lingo that is used in the industry your company is operating in.
  • You can check the LinkedIn/Facebook-profiles of your future colleagues to see if you can find something interesting to start some small-talk with them on your first day.

However don't go overboard with these things, at most spend a few hours on them. For the rest of the time, just chill out.

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