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I'm a college student applying for an internship.

Until Monday, I was in the recruiting pipeline for 2 companies. Then, one of the companies extended an offer, which I accepted (for a summer internship). I notified the other company that I could not continue in the recruiting process for summer internships, but that I was available for jobs during the academic year. The company thanked me for letting them know, but that most likely the process would stop as they rarely offer non-summer internships. Also, they asked which company I will be joining for the summer.

Should I tell/am I allowed to tell them which company I'm joining? I have not signed any NDAs with my soon-to-be summer employer restricting what I can or cannot say; it's very common for students to post on the LinkedIn profiles that they are "incoming interns" at whatever firm they'll be joining. I'm just wondering if there's any nefarious motives here, or if my recruiter just wants this information for data collection purposes.

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Should I tell/am I allowed to tell them which company I'm joining?

You are allowed. Whether you do so or not it totally up to you.

I see no harm in doing so. Companies with good recruiters/HR like to know why they are losing out on a good candidate and to whom. It helps them tune up their offers going forward.

I'm just wondering if there's any nefarious motives here, or if my recruiter just wants this information for data collection purposes.

It's almost certainly the latter.

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Should I tell/am I allowed to tell them which company I'm joining?

Allowed? Yes, unless you have been explicitly asked not to by your employer and/or signed a confidentiality agreement. The basic assumption here is that it's not a secret where you work and anyone who is interested can look it up on your LinkedIn profile anyway.

Should? Probably yes. The question is a bit obnoxious since it's none of their business. However, it's public information and there is no harm in sharing it, so if you want to maintain good will with the recruiter for future opportunities I would just tell them.

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First off, there is almost certainly NOT a nefarious purpose behind this question. Secondly, unless bound by contract there is nothing preventing you from answering. Finally, answering will earn you a very tiny bit of good will, ignoring the question will not garner you any ill will.

The most likely result of answering in any way is absolutely nothing. But I would still answer, just to be on the right side of karma — the recruiter is asking very little of you, answering cost you effectively nothing. The world works better when we try to make it better for everyone, this will make it a bit better for the recruiter.

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