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Is this a right question to ask in 4 month appraisal,

me asking manager ---> What can I do to boost my salary ?

as my next appraisal after 4 months will include pay rise.

  • It's the right question to ask before accepting a position. – user8365 Nov 20 '13 at 14:02
  • i am already in role for last 2 years but not happy with increment last year, so this time i wish to be more clear – Change Nov 20 '13 at 14:04
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It often depends on the culture of the organization and whether this would be viewed negatively or not.

Let's be straight, salary is usually indicative of the role you are doing, and your performance in that role, so I wouldn't be so direct in asking the question about salary, which may make you appear only interested in getting more money, rather than helping the business.

Ask how you can improve within your role, and what extra responsibilities or training might be available to help you do better in your role, or progress to the next level.

Progression and displaying an ability to deliver within and above your role generally will lead to a natural remuneration.

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Is this a right question to ask in 4 month appraisal,

"me asking manager ---> What can I do to boost my salary ?"

as my next appraisal after 4 months will include pay rise.

There's no right or wrong here - you are just asking questions.

You could ask this question as is, or you could instead frame it as something that benefits the company (and you as well).

For example, you could ask something like "What can I do better?" This sends the message that you are trying to be better and more valuable for the company, rather than just looking for more cash. The thought is that being more valuable to the company will lead to a higher salary for you.

As a Manager, I like people on my team to see the company view, rather than just look for more dollars.

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  • This! This is the Correct Way to Make More Money. Get good -> then ask to be paid fairly. Then get better -> ask to be paid fairly again. Let your real value pull your remuneration. – MrFox Nov 20 '13 at 14:38

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