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I recently applied for a job through an applicant tracking system (ATS).

However I just noticed today on the job ad, that due to an 'unprecedented number of suitable applicants' they would be closing the job advertisement 5 days early.

Would it be wise to send in my application directly to the managers email as well to try and demonstrate my interest and suitability for the position, going 'above and beyond' other applicants who simply just applied through the ATS? Or would that seem as pushy and annoying?

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  • How do you know the manager's email? – matt freake Jan 15 at 7:02
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    In some places it won't work. In others it will not be appreciated. In yet others it will be a positive, demonstrating 'initiative'. How likely any given company/manager is to fall into each of those categories is hard to know. – Kaz Jan 15 at 9:18
  • I have edited my questions above to clarify my intentions. – Debbie Williams Jan 15 at 14:20
  • @DebbieWilliams, what did you decide to do? What was the outcome? – teego1967 Jan 21 at 16:46
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Doing what isnt stated in how to apply or where send applications, can put a mark against you, due to not being able to follow the information and instruction provided

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  • Simple answer but actually very true. – Neo Jan 15 at 14:37
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Would it be wise to send in my application directly to the managers email as well to try and demonstrate my interest and suitability for the position, going 'above and beyond' other applicants who simply just applied through the ATS? Or would that seem as pushy and annoying?

I vote pushy and annoying. Going above and beyond means doing things like taking more courses, completing independent projects, volunteer work, etc. It's unlikely that anyone would consider circumventing their application process to get directly to the hiring manager to be a sign of fortitude.

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The whole point of an ATS (applicant tracking system) is to filter out as many candidates as possible so that only a very small number of "perfect match" candidates remain for further consideration. It works on the assumption that ideal candidates have all the "right" keywords and format in their resumes, the "right" amount of experience, the "right" degree, no gaps, nor weird career paths, etc, etc. Do such screening/tracking practices actually deliver? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

The fact is many jobs are not filled by people filling out a form on a website, uploading their resume, and crossing their fingers. Many jobs, especially really desirable ones, are filled by people exercising their professional contacts, by referrals, or by professionals reaching out to other professionals who are interested in the work (and not HR functions).

If you know who the hiring manager is, it doesn't hurt to contact them directly with a personal note introducing yourself, why you're interested in the position, and a compelling case for why you're the one for the job. You don't have to mention anything about the ATS when you contact the hiring manager. The worst they will do is ask you to apply through the "long shot" ATS.

Generally speaking, it's usually a good idea to bypass HR (and their filtering systems) for the early stages of your communication with the potential employer. This is not always possible, sometimes you just have to use the ATS and leave your resume to fate.

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    This is potentially dangerous advice. As pointed out in other answers, this may count against the applicant as trying to ignore guidelines. Maybe you could edit to point out that this is only a good idea if you have a previous relationship with the manager? – sleske Jan 15 at 10:00
  • It's only dangerous if you define "dangerous" as not getting a call back on a long shot application. – teego1967 Jan 21 at 16:47
  • Of course, in the context of a job search "dangerou" means "dangerous for the job search". – sleske Jan 22 at 7:36
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Would it be wise to 'reach out' to the managers email and introduce myself, to try and demonstrate my interest and suitability for the position (attaching my CV as well), Or would that seem as pushy and annoying?

It wouldn't be pushy to send an email listed on the job advertisement stating your name, date of application, and that you are still interested in the position. If you actually went to an interview, and the manager gave you a card with his email, it also wouldn't hurt to simply send a follow up email.

However, to call a manager or go into the company property to ask some manager you never met or seen before, now that's a pretty bad idea. In this day and age, it would create a security concern that might get the police involved or them beefing their security up and asking you not to enter the property any longer. In best case they would tell you to leave the property immediately but in the worst case it plays out like I wrote above.

My advice: send an email that's on the job posting. Don't call/ask for people you never met before.

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Yes, but not because of the reason you give. Contacting the manager to apply directly is fine and all, but it might come off as pushy, it doesn't guarantee the manager will read your application, it doesn't really do much at all.

Contacting the manager / someone at hr directly to ask to discuss the position and working at the company will do these things. It might not work in this particular instance, because I guess there is a time crunch of some sort for this role, but generally teaching out and taking to ppl is the best bet.

I rather like working with people I like, as does the entire rest of the planet. People like meeting other people in controlled environments. Asking people to discuss a role -even better if you know someone at the company to discuss the role with (someone you worked with in the past)- is a really great way to push yourself to the top of the pile.

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