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I've been working at my company for 6 years. I recently put in a request for a salary raise however I think I low balled myself a bit. With that being said I've been interviewing at a few different companies so I can see what's out there. Going through the interview process for different companies has been exciting. Now, my concern is if I'm offered a position which pays more than what I'm getting now. How could I go about asking my manager to match this?

If I were my manager I would subconsciously be thinking ("We just gave you a raise WTF sort of thing")

Should this circumstance arise how should I go about handling this?

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  • Does this answer your question? How to use an external offer in salary negotiation WITHOUT threatening to quit
    – gnat
    Mar 24 at 14:15
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    "How could I go about asking my manager to match this?" Why are you interviewing for other companies if you are content staying at your current company for some more money?
    – sf02
    Mar 24 at 15:26
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    Does this answer your question? Do I mention a competing offer when negotiating a raise? Mar 25 at 0:58
  • Asking for multiple raises in short succession isn't great (regardless of reason, for the most part). It would generally make more sense to try to get one larger raise instead, or wait (at least) 6 months to a year before asking for another raise. Although this is much less likely to cause problems than if you were to mention an offer when asking for a raise. Mar 25 at 1:08
  • @green1919, If you get and accept a good offer from another company, then simply hand your current boss a resignation letter with a 2 week notice. If your boss really wants to keep you, he will bring up a counter offer. If not, you are free to go. Good luck. Mar 25 at 1:46
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How could I go about asking my manager to match this?

You generally don't. Counteroffers rarely work out (for a variety of reasons).

"We just gave you a raise WTF sort of thing"

That's your manager's problem not yours.

Should this circumstance arise how should I go about handling this?

You resign, serve your notice period well and leave. You have been actively looking: that's a clear sign that something is not working out with your current gig and since you are excited about interviewing, there are clearly better options. Compensation is just one factor in this.

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    Counteroffers rarely work out (for a variety of reasons). Could you elaborate or link to a relevant thread?
    – henning
    Mar 25 at 10:26
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    One is that your employer will discover how much weight you put on money. Money is important, we all work for it. But most successful employees don't only work to get the paycheck (and won't work without paycheck of course) Mar 25 at 11:50
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    lol @ successful employees. Successful in whose eyes? Mar 25 at 13:55
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    @henning--reinstateMonica: if you want details, please ask a separate question. Quick piece of data: "CEB’s data shows that 50% of employees who accept a counteroffer leave within 12 months" hbr.org/2016/09/why-people-quit-their-jobs
    – Hilmar
    Mar 25 at 16:28
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Go to job interviews to change jobs, not to match what they offer.

Generally speaking it is a bad idea to go to job interviews then come back with a letter saying they're going to pay me X dollars, and I want that amount from you. They'll likely not agree with that approach and if they do, it usually means they're caught off guard and will likely dump you later on when they can safely hire someone and swap you out.

Best idea is to go to job interviews, find a position, turn in your 2 weeks, perhaps hear what they say, but I would lean towards going to the new job. After all you already made your demands, so would you trust an employer who suddenly able to meet your demands after saying no when you're leaving? Why couldn't they simply give you what you ask when you asked for it? You got to think of it that way.

The only time I would sort of agree with hearing their demands is if you never asked them and they make some offer that seems good. For example, you turn in your 2 weeks, they say hold on will giving you a X% raise be helpful? However, if you made your demands, and they said no, or gave you a generic excuse, I would pass on the offer and continue with the notice period. For example, you say, "I want a 15% raise." They say, "Sorry, we just don't have the money right now." Then you say, "Okay, I found a new job, here's my 2 weeks notice." Then they say, "Hold on, would the 15% raise make you stay?" Then at that time, I would say no thanks and continue with my notice.

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You put in your notice, tell them you appreciated working for them and that you got a great offer somewhere else, and leave it at that.

If they want to ask what they can do to keep you, you respond innocently, "I mean if you want to match it, i'll certainly consider it."

You don't want to be cocky, arrogant, or aggressive. Otherwise, why would they consider keeping you. I will try to make accommodations for my productive employees that have a good work ethic and are team players.

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All other things being equal you go to your current boss, detail the offer you've had and ask not just whether, but by how much your current employer will better it.

Since you've already had the offer, what could you lose?

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  • "what could you lose?" - see the other answers, i.e. "They'll likely not agree with that approach and if they do, it usually means they're caught off guard and will likely dump you later on when they can safely hire someone and swap you out". Also, if they refuse, asking is probably not going to have a huge effect by itself, but it could make them have a slightly worse opinion of you, making them less likely to consider you for opportunities in future and making any reference they give you slightly worse. Mar 27 at 2:31
  • @BernhardBarker That can be true for any number of people and still, it's one of the most-used ploys in pay, T&C negotiation. I first heard of it nearly 45 years ago and I've prolly heard it every year since. Mar 28 at 20:44
  • Just because it might be commonly used doesn't mean it's a good idea (unless the company culture is dysfunctional enough that that's the only way to get a reasonable salary, in which case it's probably a better idea to just leave). Mar 28 at 20:53
  • @BernhardBarker Thanks and I'm not about to play numbers with you, yet why d'you suppose so many successful agencies - and employees - still recommend that as the best way forward. Mar 28 at 21:19

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