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I am working as a contractor hourly basis as a mobile application developer (I have 3 year experience, I am the only mobile developer).

We don't have any document or anything, but I admit it is a small ecommerce app with payments and there is its companion app.

There are always small frequent changes in features which is affecting the code quality, also I tend to make too many bugs since changes affect other parts and also there is a companion mobile application which is affected. I am working with a technical person, the project/company owner (who decides the features required), who is very senior (almost 10 year experience) and is also into software development (but not in mobile development)

How do I solve this problem? I feel guilty and incompetent about creating so many bugs. Also time is a constraint I work only part time. I think I do well when I have clear idea about features and documentation

Also there is no feedback from project owner (he doesn't say anything not annoyed or something along that line) but I think no will like so many small bugs but I am not able to do things quickly it takes time to make small changes, and then test both the apps on mobile devices

I don't know what I am lagging if anyone can help , I asked for feedback once but got nothing , project owner must be too busy I'm not sure. Does this indirectly mean I should quit?

Project owner never says anything just we talk about features to add and fix bugs.

Is it common practice it's my first time contracting

Thanks

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  • I don't think you should quit. Can you ask the company for more time to develop this app ? This way you can test thoroughly and fix more bugs. If the company asks for too many code changes, then it will affect the delivery time. (Note: I guess the company will unlikely to hire an extra tester or second developer to work with you on this project as they don't want to increase the cost. So, it may make sense to extend the due date for the project as you are the only person working on it.) – Job_September_2020 Mar 31 at 17:50
  • Thankyou for the answer yes I can surely do that .But it says bug fixes are unkillable and features development time goes more than 5 hours they say why you are taking so long – user8227740 Mar 31 at 18:12
  • @Joe Strazzere Problem is less time more work is required,so I feel bad about code quality and look like a fool with many bugs.i can't produce quality work quickly – user8227740 Mar 31 at 18:16
  • @Joe Strazzere No response first time and second time insist that bugs created should not billable but when doing first time they want too fast .Some how they make me feel guilty – user8227740 Mar 31 at 18:22
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    @user8227740 Owners always underestimate the time needed to develop bug free software. If they are insisting that bug fixes are not billable time, then you need to be charging a heck of a lot for the writing of the code (something like $250/hr.) because there will always be bugs in code. Every time that I tried to not bill for bugs, I lost my shirt on the contract. Don't do it. Insist on being able to bill for bug fixes. Of course, they will try to make you feel guilty. That is how they are able to take advantage of you. – David R Mar 31 at 20:23
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As a fellow developer that worked on several contract engagements i can suggest TDD (Test Driven Development) as only solution for your situation.

Especially remote, part-time engagement solution HAVE to be engulfed by tests

Depending on your development environment , there are plethora of test frameworks you can use.

Update:

@user8227740 All you can do is suggest use of unit tests, stating required time and the code quality resulting from it.

Actual decision is your manager.

And if it would be NOT to implement unit tests, you don`t have to be morally burdened by issues, bugs etc stemming from lack of unit tests

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  • Thank you for your response. Less hours quality work is expected I hv started writing unit tests but I hv to volunteer my time – user8227740 Mar 31 at 17:20
  • @user8227740 All you can do is suggest use of unit tests, stating required time and the code quality resulting from it. Actual decision is your manager. And if it would be NOT to implement unit tests, you don`t have to be morally burdened by issues, bug etc stemming from lack of unit tests – Strader Mar 31 at 17:53
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    Thankyou that seems like the right thing to do – user8227740 Mar 31 at 17:55
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Simple suggestion: "become a full-time employee."

I'm quite serious. Tell them: "all right, you have to hire me." Then, you can work out the remaining (many!) issues with your manager.

Your situation is, quite obviously, "employment." (The US Internal Revenue Service would instantly see right through it ... Don't go there.) Therefore, position yourself to take full advantage of employment law.

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