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I applied for an entry level for a company based in UK. I have been rejected and they did not give me any reason. Despite the fact that I have a PhD and 2 years work experience in the same role.

They said, We have concluded that the skillset and experience of some of our other candidates are a closer match to our specific requirements than your own, and we will therefore not be taking your application any further.

Then, they readvertised the job again.

I contacted the HR and asked why I have been rejected then? Or if it is a new role?

The reply came as, Due to the high volume of applications we receive, we have a policy to only provide feedback on applications that make it through to the formal interview stage. I hope this is understandable.

Could someone please tell me if it is possible that I have been rejected based on my name Despite the fact that I have the right to work in the UK?

And should I email them again?

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    Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Kilisi May 8 at 22:04
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HR departments could reject your CV based on spelling, fonts, whatever, and especially if they're outsourcing it, rejection could happen because they are seeking in the CV a particular term isn't present.

Another idea is that the position isn't actually available but they are harvesting CV for having a pool of people to call in case they've a position opening in the future or find how bad is the famine outside, so to speak.

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    "or find how bad is the famine outside" - brilliant picture. ++1 – Captain Emacs May 4 at 12:37
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We have concluded that the skillset and experience of some of our other candidates are a closer match to our specific requirements than your own, and we will therefore not be taking your application any further.

This is a stock reply from HR. It says "we're not hiring you", don't try and read anything into the details of what it says. It is deliberately as vague as possible almost precisely to prevent having to debate things with candidates who say things like

Despite the fact that I have a PhD and 2 years work experience in the same role.

and

Despite the fact that I have the right to work in the UK

and think this means they get a free pass to an interview. Honestly, there is absolutely nothing in what you've presented which would make me think you've been rejected on the basis of your name - unless you have actual evidence otherwise, assume that you have been rejected on not being a good fit for the role and move onto the next one.

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  • There are entry level jobs where having a PhD would be the reason a candidate is not a good fit, especially if all of their experience is in academia. – ColleenV May 4 at 16:42
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Initial screening of applications is often computer based, or very quick and done by non technical people looking at how well your application and/or CV fits the job description. So possibly you didn't hit enough of the key words they were looking for or format your CV or application in a way that was easy to read quickly. That or you were rejected out of hand for being over qualified (e.g. a junior role would not be expected to direct their own work, whereas having a PhD you have demonstrated a capability to work independently and be self directed)

Subsequently re-advertising may have occurred due to the (possibly excellent) candidate pulling out after being offered the job for various reasons, and the other shortlisted candidates having found jobs.

I would advise you to reach out to your university careers centre (or elsewhere) a to get your CV or application looked over before your next application.

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    They might even have paid for refreshing the post in advance. – Michael McFarlane May 5 at 21:46
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We don't know. The truth is that it is possible- I assume by "based on my name" you mean "based on the gender, or religion, or ethnicity, or national origin which are suggested by my name." Discrimination based on those things are not legal. Discrimination because they don't like what color paper you used, or what font, or that your name is 3 syllables are not illegal.

The problem is proving that the rejection was based on something not legal. In the US* sometimes you get "lucky" and someone goes on record saying the wrong thing- it would need to be said to multiple people probably. It's rare. realistically, you would need to see many people rejected apparently due to such a factor, or set up a sting- as suggested in the comments, send in the same resume with names typical of White Britons, male gender, etc, and see what happens.

I know you tagged UK, just giving perspective from this side of the pond. I imagine the broad concepts are similar.

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