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Thanks to the remote work becoming more popular and my job allowing me to take on roles on different companies, I have been working full-time for one company and part-time for another. It's been almost a year and I have been wondering if adding different jobs taking place at the same timeframe to my resume would hurt my chances of getting hired in the future. Is it better to just list one role and completely ignore the other one?

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    Does this answer your question? Résumé Advice When Full Time and Contract Work Overlap
    – gnat
    May 8 at 13:25
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    Please note that I have significantly changed my answer since you accepted it.
    – Levente
    May 8 at 14:19
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    @gnat It sort of does, but Levente's answer answered the core problem that I'm having. Also, thanks Joe for the feedback!
    – Furkanicus
    May 8 at 20:14
  • @JoeStrazzere suggesting that a 150% workload's merit is that it shows initiative, I think, is not keeping nor the employee's, nor the working class' best interests in focus. Rather, it contributes to a culture of systemic exploitation. Meanwhile, in several parts of the world they are promoting 4-day work-weeks. (Partly due to how thanks to automatization, the exporting of workplaces (advancing globalization) and the pandemic, there is less and less to do.)
    – Levente
    May 8 at 20:38
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Update:

I feel I might have jumped into too quick assumptions, and — at first — had given shallow advice.

To fix that, here is the updated variant:


About the format:

First of all, regarding your concern about the format: the CV is not about presenting a timeline "in the correct fashion". The CV is about selling yourself as best as you can. Accordingly, indicating parallel employment is of zero concern in regards of "format".

From then on however, different considerations apply whether to include something or not:

1: Relevance

Could those roles you held be considered — even remotely (pun not intended) — relevant for the new workplace?

If yes, then that's suggesting: yes, include it.

Having held two positions in different roles instead of one, and having spent more time on duty, makes you all the more experienced (and versatile!) and thus valuable for an employer. Experience — in other words, an indicator of being capable of doing something — is paramount in selling you.

If, however one of them were rather irrelevant to the newly applied position, I would leave it out:

They say, you have n minutes to sell yourself: it's how long an HR person will spend on your CV. It could be as low as 1-2 minutes. You don't want to hinder the HR person's ability to find your strengths on the page in this blink of a time.

Listing non-game-changer parallel achievements would just roll obstacles in the reader's way, distracting their attention from the good stuff in the process. Do not compete against yourself in this way.

2: How you want to appear

Now, seeing that one had held a full-time and part-time position at the same time, doesn't necessarlily suggest that they did this for the enjoyment of the situation. In other words, the assumption could be made that they needed the money.

Which in turn, can reveal about you that you are sort of squeezed for money (precisely, it may suggest that you had accepted a full-time contract for less money than you needed; this better not create a precedent) (regardless of whether two thirds of the population is in similar shoes or not).

In any case, this could bring you into a disadvantageous position when it comes to a salary negotiation. So, in order to improve your position there, you may choose not to highlight the parallel employment.

Conclusion

You need to weigh these factors, and decide accordingly — on a case by case basis, for each of your applications.

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  • Thanks for the detailed answer! This definitely helped me think in the right direction.
    – Furkanicus
    May 8 at 20:11

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