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I got accustomed to scheduling a proper time slot when a recruiter wants to have an initial phone interview to discuss a job position or my application. That way I can make sure I have the precise state of mind regarding the position, the company, and my relevant concerns during the conversation, especially when I need to emphasize my important skills and expertise related to the position.

But, I had a few cases when a recruiter called my number and started to dig into my background right off the bat. Even though they mention the title of the position, but I cannot remember all the important details of the job description, especially when I am deeply involved in doing something else right before having the phone call.

So, would it be appropriate to ask for scheduling a more convenient time to have this conversation? or professionally is it expected for the applicants to receive ad-hoc phone calls regarding their applications?

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    As an aside, don't let people you don't know bully you into giving them information about yourself over the phone. Pressuring you with questions instead of scheduling a call and giving you time to prepare is social engineering technique used to prevent you from thinking too hard about whether you should be giving them the information they're asking for. People who aren't trying to take advantage of you in some way should be willing to schedule a call at a more convenient time for you.
    – ColleenV
    May 24 at 18:36
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    Bob, this is actually a duplicate but I can't find it. Certainly, just immediately tell the recruiter that you will speak to them at a future time - don't "let them get a word in". If they then barge in a question, just repeat that you will speak to them at a future time and hang up.
    – Fattie
    May 24 at 18:57
  • @ColleenV, when I checked my application after the phone call, I found that the recruiter who called me was truly responsible for the initial screening phase. But, by getting involved in an unplanned conversation, I had the exact feeling that you described!
    – Bob
    May 24 at 18:58
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    @Bob Not every person who uses that technique is a scammer. I've found that when I feel pressured, I'm more likely to do things that aren't in my own best interest and it's better for me to slow down. Some really aggressive legitimate recruiters can be pushy like that, but sometimes what is good for them is also good for you. I have gotten in the habit of stopping a conversation when I start to feel things moving along foo fast and I haven't regretted it so far.
    – ColleenV
    May 24 at 19:08
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    I don't know all the ways they could benefit; I don't change jobs very often. I have caught myself agreeing to do things I decided not to do after I hung up though. A few recruiters have tried to pump me for information about where I was applying, who I was working with, what interviews I had been on and what they asked about, etc. I assume that information helped the recruiter be more competitive in placing candidates in general rather than helping me in particular. It probably didn't harm me other than taking up my time, annoying me that they were getting me to work for them for free.
    – ColleenV
    May 24 at 19:57
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So, would it be appropriate to ask for scheduling a more convenient time to have this conversation? or professionally is it expected for the applicants to receive ad-hoc phone calls regarding their applications?

I see no problem in you asking to schedule a meeting/call with more convenient time.

Hello, is this Bob? I'm calling you from [x] regarding position [y], and would like to ask you a few questions.

Hello, yes, Bob here. I'm sorry but right now I'm in the middle of something. Would you mind if we talked later, when I'm free? How about today at xx:xx?

I think it would be unreasonable to expect a prospect candidate to drop everything they are doing and take the whole call when the recruiter decides to call.

In fact, I feel it was a bit unconsidered/rude from part of the recruiter. They should have asked you in the first moments of the unexpected call if you were able to talk in that moment, or propose a fixed meeting/call when you both were able to take it.

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