0

2 years ago, I started working in a company in the IT field. Honestly, everything worked well regarding the job and work environment. However, due to an unpredicted change in my family life, I had to relocate to somewhere far from the company. So, I had to leave the company after 4 months of working there. Despite that, my boss told me he is always open to hearing from me regarding working for them again.

Now, that my family life has become more stable and I'm looking for another job, I have the possibility to relocate to the company's town and work there again. Personally, I have that intention to continue the really promising path I started there. I also consider that if I start there again, I would be happy to be there at least for the next 2-3 years.

However, I do not know how the company and my boss would look at this proposal? I'm sure the first question would be "what if Bob leaves us again in another 4 months"? Also, I'm not sure if HRs would always recommend not to employ again the person who has left the company early.

So, I wonder if this situation has been experienced by others too and if there is a piece of professional advice on how to approach in such cases? Also, there is no position officially advertised by the company. But, I want to know if his team still wants to invest in such a position or not.

2
  • 4
    It will be impossible for any of us to predict how this specific company would react. The possible outcomes, you seem to already know. Why wouldn't you just try to get back in touch with this manager and see what can be done there? – Laurent S. May 26 at 12:35
  • 3
    All you can really do is send a short polite email to Boss. – Fattie May 26 at 15:05
4

my boss told me he is always open to hearing from me regarding working for them again.

That could be just a polite thing to say. They could mean it, or they may not mean it.

I'm sure the first question would be "what if Bob leaves us again in another 4 months"?

That will be a question that goes through your old bosses head. Be prepared to answer that question. But you also have to get to a point that they can find the answer.

That means you should address it in the cover letter. You might also reach out to your old manager even before you apply. That gives you an opportunity to explain the situation, and also a way for you to judge their reaction.

Also, I'm not sure if HRs would always recommend not to employ again the person who has left the company early.

When you apply at some point they will link your application to your previous time with the company. It is impossible for us to know what their policy will be.

It will also depend on what information is in your employment record. If the time you were an employee was filled with events that almost got you fired, then your are probably not getting rehired. If it was hard to get you to return company equipment, then they might want to avoid the drama again.

It is possible that your old manager can smooth over any disagreement from HR.

I would start wit the old manager, and see how it goes.

You will have to be prepared to apologize for leaving after just a few months. you will also have make it clear that the reason for leaving no longer applies, and you don't expect to be in that situation again. Don't say I will probably stay for 2 or three years. You want them to think you will stay forever.

3
  • Do you suggest a way to convince my former boss that I really want to stay there for at least 2-3 years? – Bob May 26 at 12:55
  • 1
    added more words about what to say. – mhoran_psprep May 26 at 13:02
  • OK. I may not say that I would stay 2-3 years. But, I also cannot promise/lie to them to be there forever. At least, in my line of work staying in the same position for more than 3 years doesn't look good on your CV, unless you are promoted to a higher position in the company. – Bob May 26 at 18:49
2

Despite that, my boss told me he is always open to hearing from me regarding working for them again.

Considering that your boss said they're open to hearing from you, just contact them directly (if they still work there) and tell them you're open to starting there again. Alternatively you could try applying through the official channels, but I'm not sure that'd improve your chances. Just be polite and professional. The worst that can happen is them saying they don't have interest anymore.

1

Really this is why professional networking sites like linkedin exist but if you don't have that then reach out with an email.

I would check their careers page first though as if they don't have a suitable role on the careers page is highly unlikely they'll just invent one for you.

However, I do not know how the company and my boss would look at this proposal? I'm sure the first question would be "what if Bob leaves us again in another 4 months"? Also, I'm not sure if HRs would always recommend not to employ again the person who has left the company early.

You left due to a family issue and hopefully never left a mess behind when you left so you left on good terms (hopefully). So I don't believe anyone would hold this against you.

So, I wonder if this situation has been experienced by others too and if there is a piece of professional advice on how to approach in such cases?

I had a similar experience I left a company and a few weeks after I left my manager contacted me via email to offer me a new position at a 48% pay rise. I never took it because the reasons I left were that I didn't like the company.

I tend to think once you've left a company you shouldn't go back as there is always a different company willing to give similar benefits but that's just me and the industry I work in you millage may vary.

1

I work for a company where this is not uncommon. I've quite a number of coworkers who left the company for various reasons and later returned (often because it turned out that the grass isn't greener on the other side). Our previous CTO often quipped "you're allowed to make a mistake" about this practice.

Of course, not every company looks at this this way. Whether the company you worked for welcomes people back or not is something we cannot answer. Only the company itself can.

Just ask. Send a message to your boss and say you do not mind returning to the company. Ask what his thoughts are, and how you should proceed.

The worst that can happen is that they say no. Then all you've lost is the half hour writing an email. If you don't initiate contact, you're guaranteed not to return.

1

I think it would be case by case, by honestly. If during the time you leave the company, you keep contact and have a good relationship with your boss, then there is no doubt about that.

I have heard a case that a person come and left the company for 3 times. But in this case, the company don't care about people come and go, they just need people work at the work time.

But, if a position need some people training for long time to work, then you should be care about their real thinking mind.

However, what you could lose in this case?

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .