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I have recently needed to learn another programming language in a very short amount of time for a project I'm working on. How can I show on my resume that I am a dynamic and fast-learning fellow from the experience above?

Also, I write articles in my field that is 'quite' well received (i.e. I make 'technical' things easily swallow-able). Is this advantageous to put in a resume, again as evidence that I could communicate well?

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    The first is impressive but few people really understand it. The second is rarer than hens teeth and should hotlinked on PDF versions of your resume. Managers want communicators, most developer ads make that plain. – Meredith Poor Dec 12 '13 at 6:57
  • Are you able to post any code for the new language on github or something similar? Maybe you could post some preliminary work you've done if you're not allowed to expose code that belongs to a company. – user8365 Dec 13 '13 at 12:27
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The best way to do this requires reworking your entire resume from a skills focused resume to what is sometimes called a "CAR" (challenge-actions-results) resume.

A good explanation of this formate can be found here: http://jobsearch.about.com/od/resumewriting/a/resumewow.htm

Mixing the two styles, especially in the same job summary, doesn't work, so just add a "skills:" line to the end of each job summary, or just aggregate all skills on separate page that is appended to your resume so recruiting databases algorithms can still find you.

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    Hi virtualxtc. I think your answer is very good and would like to ask that you add more details from the linked article to it, so that it won't go obsolete once the link changes. It's very okay for answers to get lenghty if the information is relevant like this. – CMW Dec 12 '13 at 10:09
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I have recently needed to learn another programming language in a very short amount of time for a project I'm working on. How can I show on my resume that I am a dynamic and fast-learning fellow from the experience above?

Your resume should list the programming language that you learned. And in the entry for the position, you might include something like "rapidly learned X in order to complete project Y"

Otherwise, your Cover Letter is where you expound on your ability to be a "dynamic and fast-learning fellow".

Also, I write articles in my field that is 'quite' well received (i.e. I make 'technical' things easily swallow-able). Is this advantageous to put in a resume, again as evidence that I could communicate well?

Yes, this sort of thing is often very advantageous.

If the articles are publicly-available, then you could reference them in a "Publications" section on your resume.

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