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For bachelors and masters in Computer Science, I attended elite(top10) schools in India and US. Then, I worked in two S&P 400 companies with a total work exp of 4 years.

I was fired on a company-specific visa (march 20, COVID), and govt took one year to give me an open visa (which eventually leads to a PR) in Canada.

I built a copy of best<>my<>test<>com in this time which I link a demo in resume. I do frontend and android.

I notice many calls come to me but none of them proceed to the interview stage. What could be the reason for this? What can I do next to improve my chances?

I am depressed. Would career counseling help?

I didn't update the last date on Linkedin of the job loss.

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  • @JoeStrazzere Thanks for commenting. Honestly, the reason was office politics and consecutive 4 loss-making quarters for the company. They decided to terminate me in the midst of the pandemic. Friends/family tell me that I am the best and its a matter of time before I land a new job, even directors of some companies that come within my network. But I think they are just motivating. Is there another idea/solution to answer my questions? Jun 22 at 19:53
  • Also, can I mention it is a sabbatical if I was terminated. Thanks Jun 22 at 19:56
  • @JoeStrazzere thanks. Also, I was not allowed to legally work in that period, and government took an year of delays in issuing me a (new) visa Jun 22 at 19:59
  • Sure. updated title. Would education and work-ex not matter much? I was under the impression that they would be important enough to nullify my break. But, now I think I was probably wrong. Jun 22 at 20:02
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    @limitess_ambition, Are you currently in India or Canada ? I think overall the economy is still not as strong as it was before pandemic in many countries. So, for most people, it will take a lot longer to go through many interviews to get a job. Be patient and keep applying for as many jobs as you can at many different companies. Good luck. Jun 22 at 20:12
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You mention you're from India, and that often you get calls, but they don't lead to interviews.

In my experience, they've seen your resume on job portals before calling you.

This means your resume is not the problem.

If you're getting the phone calls, and not progressing, you should focus on the contents of the phone call.

Maybe record the next few and share with some friends to see if you're needing improvement with how you interview.

I've seen many people that have experience, and skills, but over the phone or in person, their communication skills make them present as a much less experienced person, or they're not sounding confident in their answers...

Find out what is being said during your interview calls - record it, focus back on it, and think....

  • Are you asking for too much money?
  • Are they explicitly asking you to answer the gap on your resume? If so, it may be that this is part of the issue. Again, it would help if you could listen back and read, what the person's response was when you explained it, if they seemed fairly satisfied with the response or not.
  • Are you telling them that you've been fired? I would recommend just saying you stopped working at that company.
  • Are the calls at all relevant to the position you're looking and qualified for? If you don't meet 50-60% of the job requirements, it may be a waste of time. Unfortunately, there are some low quality recruiters that call literally everyone, for literally every position, just shotgunning the market. This could be part of it.

Lastly - If it's anything like it is back in the US, there's a general uneasiness at companies around hiring people in from other countries. Not that that's fair, or potentially even legal, but they may view the fact that you're there on a visa as a sign that you may have trouble staying there in the future.

People may be uneducated about the process, think it's going to be more difficult than it even is, etc, and might just move on to the next person. I'd avoid mentioning it unless asked directly about it.

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  • I'm also not sure how things are in Canada, but here in Europe, certain work visas (like the one I'm on) have a lot of requirements, like the hiring company must be a pre-approved sponsor - which is a lengthy and expensive process, only certain positions from a government-defined salary range are eligible, etc. This might be a complicating factor Jun 23 at 6:27

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