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I've recently started to look for some jobs online, and it appears that each time I want to apply for some position I have to either fill out some online profile at a specific website, or try to maintain a set of offline CVs for different job types. What are some good tools one can use for creating and maintaining an online CV, work history, demo projects and the like?

closed as not constructive by jcmeloni Jun 10 '12 at 20:10

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  • We're discussing the appropriateness of this sort of "recommended tool for X" question in this Meta Discussion – Rarity Jun 10 '12 at 2:00
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    Hi ThePiachu - based on a discussion we had in meta about this type of question, I've closed it at this time. I would urge you to edit it to be more specific and less of a polling, at which time we'd certainly open it up again. Thanks! – jcmeloni Jun 10 '12 at 20:11
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    Which would be a proper place to ask such question? – Daniele B Dec 4 '12 at 11:36
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A very popular choice in Europe is the Europass, an initiative of the European Commission's Directorate-General for Education and Culture. Other than a standard CV, the Europass offers tools for:

  • Language passport, a self-assessment tool for your language skills and qualifications,
  • Europass Mobility, a document to record knowledge and skills acquired in another European country.
  • Certificate Supplement, a document describing the knowledge and skills acquired by holders of vocational training certificates, and
  • Diploma Supplement, a document describing the knowledge and skills acquired by holders of higher education degrees.

All the tools allow you to create and store the documents online, and of course store locally, in popular formats, PDF, OpenOffice formats, Microsoft Word, and XML, and offer quite a few examples and ready made templates. Although not an official format, it's widely used, to the point that it could be considered a de facto standard. If you are looking for work within the European Union, you should consider creating a Europass, regardless of whether you are a European citizen or not.

  • Just wanted to let you know I was considering offering you a bounty for this answer because it tells me exactly what I needed to know: if Europass is widely used in EU. Unfortunately, I see that this question is closed, so the bounty button is not available. – Alina Nov 3 '17 at 13:05
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The main tool is probably Word as that is the most common format.

The issue about having to fill out online profiles is basically about either recruiters padding their list of contacts so they can call you again, or employers adding you to the applicant tracking system.

Frequently these days, and in particular in the technology industry (but spreading rapidly) a LinkedIn profile is coming to replace the traditional CV/resume.

Tech workers are also starting to use a Stack Overflow Careers profile and users of any Stack Exchange site, from Philosophy to Photography have the opportunity to post their profile page if they are proud of it.

Finally some people, myself included just rely on a home grown resume on their own web site and that's what I do. I abandoned the Word resume 10 years ago and have never gone back.

In your technical, as in a programmer, you'll want to maintain some code that others can see on github.com, part of git which is a Distributed Version Control System for code.

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