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I am a computer science graduate and have a work experience of 2 years. I have a tiny YouTube channel where I upload lectures on System Designing (relevant to Computer Science job interviews).

My question is where should I mention this YouTube channel on my resume? Under work experience or under personal projects?

If possible, can you also provide an example?

Thank you!

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    @JoeStrazzere Unless it's monetized, and they're making enough money off of it to live off of, in which case it is their work. In many cases, they may even have employees like editors or animators. There are entire businesses built around running Youtube channels.
    – nick012000
    Aug 5 at 13:23
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Under personal projects / hobbies / interests

or any equivalent to this that your location typically uses

This can help you showcase some skills that an organization may value, such as public speaking and teaching, and provide a nice ice breaker during interviews.

However, it doesn't qualify as work experience as it is mostly a personal thing you do for your own amusement. Even if your channel is large enough to be monetized, it is not your main source of income and does not qualify you as a professional lecturer, teacher, or video editor.

Example

I work in The Netherlands and it is pretty customary here to have a "Hobbies and Interests" line at the bottom of your resume (after all the relevant stuff), with just a simple list of things you enjoy doing on your free time

Mine lists: Cooking / Baking, Sewing / Embroidery, Stiltswalking

I used to have a side hustle during high school and university making homemade cakes and fine chocolates for quite a nice amount of money - this doesn't make me a professional baker or chocolatier with 8 years of experience

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  • I would say that there would be an exception if the channel is making enough money to be their primary source of income - especially if they have employees like editors or animators to assist in the video production process.
    – nick012000
    Aug 5 at 13:25
  • I also have a "hobby" section on my resume, but I certainly wouldn't put the same emphasis on hobbies I do alone at home, like "reading" and "cooking", and hobbies I'm strongly invested in, such as participating in associations, volunteering, organizing events, which might include many hours of (paid/unpaid) work with other people, as well as trainings and official diplomas and certificates. In addition, I adapt my resume to the post I'm applying to. Maintaining a youtube channel with lectures on computer science seems a lot more relevant to a job in computer science, than baking and cooking.
    – Stef
    Aug 5 at 13:47
  • @Stef I used the example from my own resume - cooking and baking are non-ironically very relevant hobbies in my sector and field of work (I work in industrial management) Aug 5 at 14:35
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Put it in the same place as you would mention a github portfolio

Answering because I do not have enough rep to comment. All the other answers and comments seem to miss the fact that the asker clearly states in their question they are applying for jobs in the Computer Science field, and that their Youtube channel features them giving lectures about system design. This may be a hobby, but is not like having a hobby cooking channel. It's also totally irrelevant if they make money off it or not.

Your channel demonstrates your expertise within the field you are applying for. You should add it in the same way that many software engineers add a github portfolio demonstrating examples of their work to their resume.

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Put it where you like. There is no fixed format for a CV.

It could be interpreted as either work experience or personal, depending upon whether you got money from it. But that isn't the important point.

How you structure your CV shows something of your character and it is taken into account by employers. I always took the structure into account in the days when I was responsible for hiring new staff.

Just bear in mind that, although there is no fixed format, the first page is typically personal information and qualifications. Beyond that - be creative.

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I think there is a case to not put it at all

A channel on software development would be fine. But your channel is about passing interviews? My concern would be that might substantially raise expectations on the part of your interviewers, which could hurt you. If it is just about system design in general it could be beneficial though.

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