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My contract with my current company is coming to an end soon, my direct Manager had told me that they are interested to hire me as permanent. But so far I have not get any communication from management.

I recently started applying for jobs again and got an offer which is a 1 year contract job as well. I really want to know if my current employer will be taking me as permanent and the salary etc. before deciding whether to accept this new offer.

Should I talk to the Human Resource team or what is the best approach?

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    my direct Manager had told me that they are interested to hire me as permanent, but so far I have not get any communication from management - Have you considered asking your direct manager? I mean, wouldn't that be the obvious thing to do?
    – joeqwerty
    Sep 1, 2021 at 4:38
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    Isn't your manager part of the management? Sep 1, 2021 at 17:26
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    It would be very helpful to include what ‘soon’ means for you. 2 months? 2 weeks? 5 hours? Sep 2, 2021 at 10:59
  • @GrzegorzOledzki A lot of managers can tell their managers they're interested in hiring so-and-so, but won't be involved in the final say. They're more like team-leaders in that regard.
    – Mast
    Sep 3, 2021 at 12:42
  • @Mast sure. Even if their decision is not final, I still think it's their job to have things like this done. Sep 3, 2021 at 18:53

4 Answers 4

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Tell your manager you have an offer and provide a deadline

Talking to your manager is key, but insufficient. That could easily lead to it not being a priority to make you a permanent employee as they will assume they have time.

You probably need to get back to these people reasonably soon, so you must tell your manager that he has X days to make you an offer.

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    Even better, simply tell your manager you enjoyed working with them, and would be willing to continue if they signed you before [given date]. This makes your statement an offer instead of a threat/deadline.
    – Jeffrey
    Sep 1, 2021 at 20:50
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    Absolutely agree with Jeffrey's advice. Sep 2, 2021 at 12:15
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    Jeffrey, it needs to be not a threat, but an announcement of consequences. “If you don’t renew my contract in a timely manner, I’ll find a contract elsewhere” is not a threat. A clever manager would act on what you say, but many are not.
    – gnasher729
    Sep 2, 2021 at 20:04
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Normally the advice we give is don't accept a counter offer from your current company after you have a great written offer from an outside company.

This is an exception. You have a current job with an expiration date. So you had an obligation to find something that goes beyond that expiration date. You have done that. Now If you want to give your current company a chance to make you are permanent employee, then tell them about the offer you have.

So what needs to be done before you will accept their counter offer? It has to be written offer, that has no contingencies, with actual dates, and dollar figures. You will need to be able to sign this offer before the deadline from the other company. Vague promises and offers with contingencies don't help at this point.

Should I talk to the Human Resource team or what is the best approach?

I would start with your current manager, and make sure they understand there is a deadline. Your manager will know how to get the process going. Unless the company is very small calling HR will not get you anywhere, you could waste days before getting anywhere. In a small company the right person in HR will likely know you or your manager.

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    You should set the deadline (for the contract in hand), ahead of your contract ending, to allow you to perform the necessary knowledge transfer if applicable. You should also hold firm to that deadline. Your contract ending is a known factor, it's been known the entire time you have been at the company, if you are not careful you could lose the opportunity you found and then be told a permanent position doesn't actually exist. Don't accept "it's a pandemic" excuse, an offer can be generated and approved, by the appropriate people from home.
    – Donald
    Sep 1, 2021 at 13:50
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    Normally the advice we give is don't accept a counter offer from your current company after you have a great written offer from an outside company. Who is "we"? I do not think there is a consensus (or a "you/we") here...
    – AnoE
    Sep 1, 2021 at 14:13
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    @AnoE I've seen that same advice over and over on this site, and it seems like common wisdom, so I don't think the word "we" needs any more explanation. Sep 1, 2021 at 14:19
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    "Normally the advice we give is don't accept a counter offer from your current company after you have a great written offer from an outside company." - I think this usually applies to permies because the company may not regard them as a reliable employee when they've started looking elsewhere. A contractor converting to permanent is in a different position because the company is effectively trying to recruit them and knows they'll be looking around at the end of a contract anyway. Sep 1, 2021 at 14:31
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    Personally, I wouldn't even count this as a "counter-offer". It's simply a potential offer from an employer you happen to have a contract with already.
    – BenM
    Sep 2, 2021 at 3:03
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Some employers seem to have a "policy" about not extending offers of fulltime or otherwise continued employment until the very last day of the contract. The won't give you any notice of if they want to continue your employment or not until that last day.

IMO, it's a stupid policy and should be abandoned entirely. Management should be open with their employees about when employment is going to be continued or ended, especially in situations like this. If you haven't already guessed, I've been through this more than a few times and have also been burned by it without knowing how to fix any problems I didn't know existed. But I think I'm getting off topic here.

Since you have an offer, definitely let your manager know your situation and how soon you need an answer from them. Some employers will make a lot of promises to keep people, but then fail to follow through with them, so if you do get an offer, make sure it's in writing and with a date as to when it takes effect.

Or if the offer you have is significantly better than what you already have, then simply give notice and don't wait for a counter-offer.

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How about something like this:

Hi Direct Manager

I am just wondering how the permanent placement is going?

I recently received a job offer from XYZ Company which I plan to accept in the near future.

I sincerely wish to be hired as permanent with you so if we could get something in writing by September 3rd, 2021 then I will happily reject the other offer.

Thank you!

The deadline (September 3rd or anything of your choosing) is important!!! Do NOT let them string you along indefinitely.

Preferably do this via phone call.

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    Do it by phone/in-person, but also follow up with Email.
    – Chris K
    Sep 1, 2021 at 20:09
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    @ChrisK I'm not sure what kind of untrustworthy management you've dealt with in your career but following up via email is guaranteed to show "Hey, I don't trust you." and will strain your relationship. If you don't trust them then email should be the first attempt; phone call would be the follow-up closer to the deadline. This is why the ultimatum is important. Provide action by this date if you are serious about keeping me.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Sep 1, 2021 at 20:13
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    I would leave out "I recently received a job offer from XYZ Company which I plan to accept in the near future." It's too specific (XYZ) and too vague (near future) at the same time. Your boss does not need to know where you are going, only that you have a hard deadline but would prefer to stay. Sep 2, 2021 at 17:19
  • @MonkeyZeus. I've worked with management that's quite trustworthy, but not the best at note-taking. They would prefer to have concrete information like dates in writing just not to lose them, not because they are not to be trusted. Sep 2, 2021 at 17:20
  • @MonkeyZeus - this is a business arrangement. Putting it in writing just allows both parties to be on the same page. It allows you to write the date and particulars that they can refer to without needing to come back to you. They can put a follow-up flag on it in outlook with a call to action, tasks tied to it. It's not the email that's bad but how you word it. "Thanks for talking to me about extending the contract, etc. I know you may need to talk to HR, etc, here are key dates you can forward to them, etc."
    – Chris K
    Sep 4, 2021 at 17:31

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