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Recently my manager left the company, I am the only employee who worked under him and also the only employee who knew the details of half of the things he did/worked on. As a result, I was asked to take on his responsibilities upon his departure. I was promised a new title and a pay increase.

Fast forward to today (1.5 months later), I still haven't received said new title and pay increase. The company is currently undergoing a decent amount of restructuring, so it isn't surprising that its being delayed, but I recently found out that the raise also wont be retroactively applied like I assumed because I technically haven't been promoted in the system yet. Now it feels like I've been slighted out of almost 2 months of extra money that I should have received if the company wasn't being slow about things.

Is it reasonable for me to demand that money? And if so what is the best way to go about asking for it?

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  • 1) Do you have anything in writing about your pay increase? 2) Have asked your manager asked your pay rise will happen? Sep 2 '21 at 20:31
  • 3
    Demand? No, not a good plan! Ask? Sure, if that was your understanding discuss it with your new manager.
    – jwh20
    Sep 2 '21 at 20:56
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    I have nothing in writing unfortunately... I have asked and the change should go into effect in the next 2 weeks
    – Elijah B.
    Sep 2 '21 at 21:13
  • Verbal promises from companies usually do not mean a lot. There are people on this website who report that they are promised salary raise every year for 3 or 4 years from their own companies, and they still have not got the raise or title. Sep 2 '21 at 22:16
  • You are a cheap manager replacement. They show they cannot be trusted. Find a new post and hand your notice in. Be wary of subsequent promises… see other q&a on here showing that promises are not kept.
    – Solar Mike
    Sep 3 '21 at 6:52
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It's all about the wording. If they promised you the raise for the role and you have been performing his role of manager as soon as he left, then I'd expect them to perform the raise retroactively. No excuses about "name in the system" and internal processes because that can always be fixed manually. If it's not fixed it's because of the lack of motivation to fix it. They might not have to do it per law because no writing agreement was in place but ethically they should.

If It was me, I wouldn't DEMAND as per se, but I'd ask and if they say no I'd put it clear that is a big disappointment for the reasons I mentioned. But then of course, only yourself can judge if it's worth the risk. If you feel you love the job and it's not worth the risk then don't do it. I'd probably do it because the principle on what is right and wrong would play a loud bang in my brain on daily basis until I finally speak of my mind. But that's a personality thing

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Fast forward to today (1.5 months later), I still haven't received said new title and pay increase. The company is currently undergoing a decent amount of restructuring

Do you have regular meetings with your current boss? Bring it up here! Remember to phrase it in a why to help the company. Something like

Things are going well with my new role - we've had wins X and Y. Do you know when I can switch to my new title, and when raise associated with the promotion kicks in?

If you don't have 1:1s, you can send and email with about the same content. Hopefully this will convince your boss to fast track it through HR.

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  • If you do have regular meetings, sounds like more pressure could have been used, to get the promotion entered in the system. An HR action like this literally takes no time at all, nobody had any motivation, to do it earlier. Company restructuring is a lame excuse for inaction (IMO)
    – Donald
    Sep 3 '21 at 0:15
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Is it reasonable for me to demand that money?

of course. If this was promised to you, you can certainly ask them to keep their promise. Whether you can ask for retroactive pay, depends a bit and what exactly was promised to you.

And if so what is the best way to go about asking for it?

You have multiple options.

  1. Keep doing what you are doing, hope for the best, and make your peace with it, if nothing happens.
  2. Keep asking about it. However, prepare to be ignored (in which case you are back to step 1)
  3. Go a little more on the offensive: State clearly that you have been doing the new job for 6 weeks now, that you are doing it well (add a few examples) but that your title and pay does not reflect this. Ask specifically about specific actions that need to happen, milestones, obstacles and time line.
  4. Escalate further: state that the current situation is not "long term feasible" for you. That indicates that you are willing to walk over this without it being an outright threat. You can also throw in: "I'm disappointed that the company is not keeping their stated commitments and I'm not sure I can still trust the leadership".
  5. Start looking elsewhere.
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As a result, I was asked to take on his responsibilities upon his departure. I was promised a new title and a pay increase.

Fast forward to today (1.5 months later), I still haven't received said new title and pay increase.

It doesn't sound like you've been promoted. If you're doing more work for the same amount of pay, with no new authority of benefits then that sounds much more like a demotion.

If they've already decided that it won't be paid retroactively (without actually confirm when they will start paying it), then it sounds a lot like they're going to keep stringing you along with the promise of better pay tomorrow.

You're not really in a position to demand that they start paying you the new salary or give them a deadline unless you're willing to walk. But to be honest, you're probably better just lining up another job and going with that. Given that your company has (if we're feeling charitable) failed to live up to the promises that they made you or (if we're not) has lied to you in order to save money, it doesn't sound like you have much reason to trust any future promises that they make.

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