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I’ve joined a new company two weeks ago, and recently I was told by my current employees in my team that my new manager is a very harsh guy. He fired four people in last year and one of them was the one who was in my position.

This is what I gathered about him so far:

He loves to micromanage; everything you do should be done via his approval only.

He demands discipline. You should never be late or leave early.

You should do work exactly in a way he told you to so. No exceptions.

He likes to delegate others' work to you when they’re full. (like paper work, or other jobs which are not your responsibility)

Any tips on how get through this?

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  • 1
    employees ? Are you a team leader?
    – Strader
    Oct 15 at 18:48
  • My advice would be to stop listening to gossip and talk to your manager about his expectations for your work.
    – ColleenV
    Oct 15 at 18:51
  • What culture is this? Oct 15 at 22:20
  • @ThorbjørnRavnAndersen Just as importantly, what field of employment is this? A retail worker being treated this way would be fairly common; a software engineer, less so.
    – nick012000
    Oct 21 at 7:10
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Two choices:

  1. Do what you need to do to survive in this workplace

  2. Look for new position and leave as soon as you find one

Given this manager is certainty been in the company longer than you, higher guys like his results and ok with his style of management

5

Have you experienced any of this firsthand or is this hearsay passed on from others?

If the latter, I'd suggest settling into your new job and forming your own opinion.

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He loves to micromanage; everything you do should be done via his approval only.

  • Give him his wish, he want you to get his approval for everything. If you are new, this is a CYOA anyway until you learn the job

He demands discipline. You should never be late or leave early.

  • The Germans have a saying "15 minutes early is on time. On time is late, and late is unforgivable" If you have a problem with being late or leaving early, it goes far beyond this boss.

You should do work exactly in a way he told you to so. No exceptions.

  • Clear expectations? Why is that a bad thing?

He likes to delegate others' work to you when they’re full. (like paper work, or other jobs which are not your responsibility)

  • Get your work done first, and help your teammates out after your work is done. Unless you are in a union, or asked to due duties that you are untrained and incapable of, the quickest route to the unemployment line is to say "not my job"

None of this sounds that unreasonable. Ride it out and do what you are told, when you are told, the way you are told, and you should be fine.

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  • I had a co-worker who usually started at 12 and left when he felt he'd done enough. One of the two best software developers I've ever met, and the other one is dead.
    – gnasher729
    Oct 15 at 23:03
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    Micromanagement is the death of company morale, a sign of incompetence, and the fastest way to get nothing done on time.
    – morbo
    Oct 16 at 10:26
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    @Revenant_Evil if you have to tell your highly educated workers how to do every part of the job, that is not standards, that is micromanaging, having high standards does not equate the need to tell everyone every step of their job.
    – morbo
    Oct 18 at 12:51
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    I'm not commenting on anecdotal stories, I'm commenting on your lack of undersatnding the difference between 'standards' and micromanagement, which even, to break what I just said, your stories misses the mark on.
    – morbo
    Oct 18 at 21:56
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    @dfrib Wow, I am sincerely touched by what you posted. Thank you. I really don't know what to say, but, thank you Oct 27 at 22:19

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