4

I began working as a graduate teaching assistant at a university in the USA in the Fall semester of the year 2018. The Fall semester began in August, as is the norm at this university. I recently found out that this university uses "standardized dates" when it comes to employee start and end dates. The standardized date for the Fall semester is September 1st. What this means is that even though I actually began working in August 2018, their records will indicate that I began working in September 2018. I was not aware of this, so the work history section of my resume includes my actual start date (August 2018) and not the standardized start date (September 2018).

Question: When it comes to what I type on my resume, should I use my actual start date, or should I use my employer's standardized start date?

While this 1-month discrepancy may not seem like a big deal, I understand that all information on my resume should be factual. The fact is that I started working in August -- not September. My work history is still pending verification due to this discrepancy. Consequently, I have not yet passed the background check for this new position and have not start working.

EDIT: This new job will certainly be temporary. I worry that I will run into the same issue when looking for other jobs in the near future.

9
  • So the new employer does not understand "standardized dates"?
    – Solar Mike
    Oct 30 '21 at 4:37
  • Have you explained this situation to whomever is doing the background check? Can you just add a footnote to your resume? Oct 30 '21 at 4:52
  • @SolarMike - Perhaps not. I just learned about it this week. Oct 30 '21 at 4:59
  • @GregoryCurrie - I've explained it to the new employer. The background screening company did not directly ask me about it. It seems that this thing has delayed my background check for nearly a month now. I suppose I can add a footnote to my resume and CV. Oct 30 '21 at 5:04
  • 4
    Are "standardized dates" a common thing where you live? Where I live, it would be a false report and they could be sued or worse. If your first working day was for example August 27th, then reporting it as September 1st ist not "standardized", it's a straight up lie. Did they pay taxes, insurances and all applicable costs for the difference they lie about?
    – nvoigt
    Oct 30 '21 at 7:05
6

When it comes to what I type on my resume, should I use my actual start date

Just put the truth down and explain it if asked.

It's a pretty minor issue and easy to clear up.

1
  • 1
    This. Always go with the truth. It's much easier to explain other people's shenanigans when you're not actively and voluntarily participating in it.
    – Agent_L
    Nov 2 '21 at 13:27
0

Question: When it comes to what I type on my resume, should I use my actual start date, or should I use my employer's standardized start date?

Use the September start date unless that extra month would make you ineligible for the position - I got called by the background check company at work due to a 1-month error once.

They said something like "We did a records check and your resume doesn't quite line up. You're off by a month." I walked out to the parking deck and told them not to call me over something so trivial, and since they called me during work hours, they were endangering my current job. I hung up after that. A week later, the background check came through fine, and I put in my 2-weeks notice.

While this 1-month discrepancy may not seem like a big deal, I understand that all information on my resume should be factual.

You shouldn't lie on your resume, but don't worry about being a month off. It's not a big deal and my new job had a good laugh over the phone call.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .