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I recently started working in a discount store. I was put into the cashier with no experience and no training. In this place, bread, fruit and vegetables are weighed in the box, you have to learn some codes by heart. What happens if I enter the code wrong and issue a receipt? Do I create problems for the company, for example with inventory, or not?

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    Have you asked your manager?
    – sf02
    Nov 23, 2021 at 14:05
  • They have one of two expectations: 1) that you're a kid with no experience and they're okay if you make a mistake from time to time, or 2) they're expecting you to know the codes and if you get it wrong, rather than try to train you, they fire you and find someone who seems to get it right.
    – Dan
    Nov 23, 2021 at 16:26
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    If you're worried, consider creating a cheat sheets of sorts - write out the codes and what they all mean on a bit of paper, and have it next to you when you're manning the till. Though to be honest, the supermarket should probably have something like this themselves anyway.
    – user25730
    Nov 23, 2021 at 21:51

2 Answers 2

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You won't create problems with inventory. In a supermarket, things disappear all the time through theft, if you make a mistake or two nobody will notice.

You will get complaints if you charge people too much. You may get complaints if you charge them too little, but that's more rare. If you don't get too many complaints, you're Ok. And really, you should have printed sheets with all the fruit, breads etc. on them and not have to learn anything by heart.

And as Dan said: If you charge me $16.22 the supermarket cares little if that is the correct amount (within reason). What they do care about is that $16.22 ends up in your till, not a penny more, not a penny less. Because that's something they can check.

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  • Yeah truthfully when I worked as a cashier in my teen years, I don't recall a single time they looked through my sales and picked out anything I did wrong. However, they do care about making sure I get the right amount of change.
    – Dan
    Nov 23, 2021 at 16:27
  • "And really, you should have printed sheets with all the fruit, breads etc. on them and not have to learn anything by heart." - based on my observations as a supermarket customer, I doubt this is a realistic expectation. Unless they are really new in the job, all the staff I see at check-out desks know most of the product numbers by heart. Looking up every single one (in booklets that are indeed there at the check-out counter) would take way too long. (Note that this just concerns unlabeled items such as some fruits, vegetables, and bread; anything else has scannable labels on it.) Nov 25, 2021 at 6:38
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Do I create problems for the company, for example with inventory, or not?

Yes, definitely, otherwise there is no point of having those codes!

As you mentioned, you did not receive any training - do you know your manager is aware that you do not have a lot of experience and need training to be up to speed? It should be a de-facto thing, but since that did not happen, no harm in asking.

Even after that, if you do not get the required training, you can do one thing, print the codes on paper and keep that handy. Sure, for starting days it'll take longer to check codes and then tally the price, but two things

  • You'll know what are the products being sold more often than others, and you can definitely by-heart them. For rarely sold ones, you still have the reference on paper.
  • You'll avoid risk of generating wrong bill/invoice.

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