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My job is M-F, standard business hours. If I submit my two-week notice on Monday the 9th, then Tuesday the 10th is Day 1, and my last working day is Monday, the 23rd, correct?

But what if I submit the notice before the work day begins, or even over the weekend? Does Monday the 9th now count as Day 1, thereby making my last day be Friday the 20th?

My concern is that if I give less than two weeks notice, they will not pay out my earned but unused PTO, which is considerable. If I give a full two weeks, they will pay all of it.

Also, is it reasonable to request from HR that they not tell my boss until I’ve had a chance to tell him myself? I have a meeting set with him for 10 AM Monday and I’d like to speak with him before he sees my resignation but I don’t want to wait to submit and extend my notice period by another day.

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If you're in the USA, then almost without doubt unless you signed a contract which says otherwise, "2 weeks notice" is entirely optional and you get to decide what it means. It's a courtesy you extend to the company (and one they're very unlikely to extend to you should they decide to lay you off).
If you want to hand in your notice on Monday 9th and count that as "Day 1" of your notice period so that your last day is Friday 20th, then just do that.
If your company wants to only count that as 1 day short of 2 weeks, well that's just too bad. What's the worst they could do - fire you for quitting? If that were likely then they'd just fire you anyway no matter what notice you gave.

Don't beat yourself up about this. Give your notice to HR at the start of the work day on Monday and tell them that you have a meeting scheduled with your boss at 10AM to inform him.
That's all you need to do.

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  • "Unless you signed a contract which says otherwise, "2 weeks notice" is entirely optional" You have no idea if this is true without knowing the poster's location. Commented May 7, 2022 at 11:38
  • @PhilipKendall "2 weeks notice" is very much an American thing - but I'll add that assumption if that makes it clearer.
    – brhans
    Commented May 7, 2022 at 11:41
  • I’ve edited to state that if I don’t give a full two weeks notice, they will not pay out my earned, unused PTO. So, no, the worst is not firing me for quitting, as was joked, but rather that I would lose a considerable amount of money.
    – Jenny
    Commented May 7, 2022 at 13:52
  • What they can do is to ding you for any voluntary departure benefit. ie If you don't give 2 weeks according to whatever their interpretation of it is they don't pay you out for unused PTO. Commented May 7, 2022 at 17:00
  • @Jenny - ok then that changes the situation. If you want all the benefits then you have to play by their rules. No-one here can tell you what's acceptable - only the company can make that determination. That being said, as others have pointed out, what they'll want is your full 10 days of work - so giving notice 1st thing on Monday morning for the following Friday to be your last day still achieves that for any half-way reasonable company.
    – brhans
    Commented May 7, 2022 at 18:27
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Always review the rules regarding PTO, insurance coverage, and the last day to use a FSA or HSA. Knowing these deadlines before quitting can make a big difference.

In the United States expect that you can't take any PTO during that two week notice period. They want to get 10 days of work out of you, and letting you take time off during those two weeks defeats the purpose.

So If the goal is to make 100% sure that you will get credit for the two weeks notice, submit the resignation during the weekend. Or very late on a Friday.

In all my years I have never seen an issue with a Monday morning resignation, but I also have not seen anything that said if less than 10 days we don't payout PTO.

I am going to assume that you are correct in your assessment regarding the two weeks notice.

Also, is it reasonable to request from HR that they not tell my boss until I’ve had a chance to tell him myself? I have a meeting set with him for 10 AM Monday and I’d like to speak with him before he sees my resignation but I don’t want to wait to submit and extend my notice period by another day.

It depends on the size of the company. In most cases I have had the employee tell their manager first, then had the manger tell HR. In many cases the employee only knows one person from HR, the one they talk to when they have a question. It isn't always clear who in HR needs to be informed. The manger probably knows better who to inform. HR only wants the written notice so they can start the checkout process.

If you start with HR, the initial part of the process might trigger a notice to your manager. They might be given a document that has to be reviewed, or something they have to confirm.

Submitting over the weekend will mean that it will be submitted electronically, and the manger may find out before the meeting. In fact I would also send an email to the manger over the weekend.

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