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In most of the job offers you see the employers are asking for some previous experience like N+ years in this, N+ years in that etc. At least in the software industry that's a law if you want to be invited for an interview.

How do you consider starting a job on a company that offers good starting salary, nice offices, young colleagues but working on a technology that is almost unused anywhere else? You can hardly find any place to use this technology, no offers in the job websites(you know everything happens), no such experience wanted anywhere or at least I can not find such places?

Can this be career closing for everything different as programming language if not what can be the benefits of taking such career path?

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  • ok, useless is just too strong I agree.
    – Bor
    Jan 25 '14 at 14:48
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You seem to be focused on software, so I will write accordingly. By technologies I mean things like programming languages and so on.

Can this be career closing for everything different as programming language?

You do not depend completely on your career to learn to use different technologies that are broadly adopted (hence, could easily allow you to switch workplaces). There are multiple sources for you to learn and apply them. As such, I do not see choosing to get hired by a company that uses a particular piece of technology that most other companies don't as a way to tie yourself up forever.

To extract a bit of advice from The Pragmatic Programmer by Andrew Hunt and David Thomas,

Learn at least one new language every year. Different languages solve the same problems in different ways. By learning several different approaches, you can help broaden your thinking and avoid getting stuck in a rut. Additionally, learning many languages is far easier now, thanks to the wealth of freely available software on the Internet.

I would add my own piece of advice and say you should keep an eye out for what's being used now, and at least get to know the technologies well enough to find your way around and build relatively simple (but relevant) projects. This will not only broaden your knowledge, but will also keep your skill set relevant for the present time, regardless of your current job's requirements.

What could be the benefits of taking such career path?

The same benefits that any other career path would bring, except for the fact that the technology you'll be using will probably not impress future employers. You can fix this problem by reading and applying what I said above, or, in the case of an interview, by explaining to them what you think the similarities between the tech you've used and the tech they're using are, and why you believe you can easily switch.

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Your question assumes that the only thing of value that you can learn from this job is the programming language that is being used there. You also don't say if it's a new language that does not have a lot of adoption anywhere (yet?), an old language that's on its way out, or simply an obscure one.

To some degree this doesn't matter. By doing well at this job you would demonstrate to a future employer that you can learn new things. This has value.

There may be opportunities to develop project management, people management or technical architect skills from this role. Again, this has value.

Don't forget salary. This is compensation for the work you're doing and if the job involves working with a obscure or dead-end language and the pay is higher to compensate for this, then that seems like a reasonable adjustment to me.

If you develop skills in an obscure area then this might increase your value to future employees. I'm a network/systems architect rather than a programmer these days and I still get calls from people who wish to offer me daft sums of money to babysit old mainframes. While I don't see my career heading in that direction, it's a nice set of skills to fall back on.

Only you can decide if the value of these areas is enough to make up for your worries. If you're worried about losing your edge in more popular technologies in the meantime then you can work on your own projects or contribute to an open source project that uses the appropriate language.

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How do you consider starting a job on a company that offers good starting salary, nice offices, young colleagues but working on a technology that is almost unused anywhere else?

What process methodologies do they use? What practices could be useful to learn from this place? Additionally, is that technology the only job function or is it part of a stack?

For example, as a Web Developer I use more than a few technologies in my work including C#, JavaScript, HTML, CSS, and SQL. Sometimes I may have to learn a new technology as what I use may require using some XML or some protocol like SOAP. When I started working in web development, I'm not sure the macro-laden version of C++ that my boss used would be found elsewhere or his custom mark-up language yet I seemed to have turned out fine.

You can hardly find any place to use this technology, no offers in the job websites(you know everything happens), no such experience wanted anywhere or at least I can not find such places?

Some companies may have internal languages or tools which is part of the job. I'm not sure I'd see this as that big a deal on one level unless you are expecting silver bullets on the job.

Can this be career closing for everything different as programming language if not what can be the benefits of taking such career path?

This could be career limiting if one wants to live in their bubble of being restrictive of what they'll use and think nothing should change ever, sure. I'd also think this is a rather poor perspective to take.

The benefit could be seeing how fast can you pick up a new skill, what kinds of formats of learning work best for you, and how willing are you to experiment with things at times. If you consider how many new things we have today compared to 10 years ago you may notice that lots of new things continually arise in technology and thus this can be a very valuable skill.

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