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A couple of months ago I asked my manager for a promotion in job title and the salary that goes with this. I was told off the record that this was not likely to happen. I proceeded to look for roles outside of the company and with the help of my manager through interview prep I was able to secure a better job elsewhere. I told my manager that I have accepted the job and that I would discuss notice with him at a later date after I received the contract.

My manager approached someone internally about my role before I handed my notice in. The person then went on to discuss my role with people around the business, many of which were my stakeholders. Would this be a breach of confidentiality? I had not actually handed my notice in at this point.

Said person then decided he wanted my role and I saw that my manager had agreed to give him the higher title that i asked for a couple of months earlier. He has no relevant experience in this kind of role and his experience in general is less than mine. All of this was done before I actually handed my notice in.

Any ideas where I stand on this in regards to confidentiality? I have since handed my notice in and have to work my long notice of a few months but this has all left a bad taste in my mouth.

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    Not in the UK, and not quite an answer: Why not simply work your notice period perfunctorily and move on to the new job without looking back?
    – Theodore
    Aug 5 at 19:00
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    So this person is your equal and they pulled you into a meeting, I don’t understand, how do you know their experience? Perhaps I am missing something
    – Donald
    Aug 5 at 21:10
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    Please do not vandalize your own post.
    – Nobody
    Aug 7 at 7:26

4 Answers 4

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It would leave a bad taste in my mouth as well.

They didn't think the job was worth the higher title and pay until the guy currently in it let them know he was moving on. They then had a change of heart.

Walk away with your head held high. You're going to a better job. They are about to learn a lesson, possibly a very painful one. First, they have to hire someone to take over your replacement's old position, and train him. Your replacement will have to help with that. Second, if your read on your replacement's knowledge and experience is correct, they are about to take a serious productivity hit in what used to be your job, and that may be very expensive.

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  • "Walk away with your head held high" This is the way to burn the bridge. Bad advice.
    – Nobody
    Aug 7 at 9:58
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    @Nobody, are you sure you read the guy's post? He asked for a promotion and raise. HIs boss said that wasn't going to happen. His boss did NOT say anything about what it might take, in the way of further training and experience, to make it happen. His boss DID help him look for another job OUTSIDE THE COMPANY. Summary: His boss KNEW that the decision had been made, FOR WHATEVER REASON, that he was not going to be allowed to go any higher at that company. When that happens, it is time to walk away and not care about flames behind you. Aug 7 at 20:06
  • "not care about flames behind you." At present, there is no higher position for the OP in the company. However, that company will never grow? When you walk away held you head high, you burn the bridge to a possible future opportunity. Besides, the world is small. The manager may become a client/customer of the OP's in the future. When it happens, how will the OP handle the embarrassment when he sees that manager again? Don't forget, the manager helped the OP to find a new job !
    – Nobody
    Aug 8 at 3:42
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    @Nobody Perhaps you are misinterpreting the expression "head held high" which is not the same thing as a "nose in the air". It doesn't have the snooty connotation you seem to be attributing to it here. Aug 8 at 19:42
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    @Nobody "head held high" means "with pride & professionalism", specifically as to not burn bridges Aug 11 at 10:27
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I told my manager that I have accepted the job and that I would discuss notice with him at a later date after I received the contract.

Before you were ready to hand in your notice you told the company you were going to quit. Your manger need to take steps to either encourage you to stay or to adjust for the hole there would be in the organization.

Yes you weren't 100% sure you were leaving, and you didn't need to tell them yet; but you ended-up telling them.

The company has the right to plan for the future. Once you alerted them to your desire to leave, they adjusted.

my manager had agreed to give him the higher title that i asked for a couple of months earlier...
... All of this was done before I actually handed my notice in

Once you said you were leaving, they would most likely not consider you for the promotion. Even if they offered it to you, and you agreed to the promotion, they wouldn't trust that you would stay. They went in another direction. The company may have decided to offer it to them just to avoid losing another employee.

What you experienced is a normal reaction by a company. That is why the general advice is don't tell anybody in the company until you are obligated to tell them.

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    +1 for "That is why the general advice is don't tell anybody in the company until you are obligated to tell them". You can't repeat that often enough. In this case nothing happened except some ruffled feathers, but it could be worse for other people.
    – gnasher729
    Aug 11 at 8:35
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Your boss knew you were a flight risk (you told them), so they took action.

They picked the best person available for the job. They knew you were leaving shortly - even before you signed the contract - so there was money in the budget (your salary) for the position. The person getting the job negotiated a higher job title.

What did you expect the company to do? Pull out the sackcloth and ashes, and have a mourning party? No - you're going, so they took action to reduce the risk to the company.

Move on, and don't look back.

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The company acted 100% appropriately.

The company knew that you were leaving. You told the company yourself. Your managers duty, and the duty of everyone in the company, was to do what is best for the company. They found a replacement for you, that replacement was in a better negotiation position (your position was: I do the same as before, but want a better title and pay, his position was: I switch to a different position, but want a better title and pay) and will be getting more money, but the company has in no way acted against you.

You have no reason to complain. What you say to another employee regarding company business (and you leaving the company is company business) is not confidential.

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