9

I work for a consulting company (specifically with one of its clients).

My employer approved PTO for me. It starts in two weeks. Client is ok with that.

I think I will receive a job offer soon. I know I should sign a contract and only after that give notice period (it should be three weeks notice period) to my current employer.

Let's suppose I receive that job offer. Should I ask my new employer a start date further in the future explaining approved PTO and then sign that contract? This means I would need more time before starting at the new job because PTO+Notice period.

When I interviewed at the new company PTO had not been approved. They only know about the three weeks notice period.

Both companies are from US. I work remotely and I don't live in the US.

My goal is to change jobs as soon as possible without burning bridges with anyone.

Thanks,

6
  • Is there anything in your contract that says you can't take PTO off during your notice? What country are you in? In the UK I would give them my notice period of three months and just enjoy the approved PTO. I wouldn't even consider giving them an extra two weeks. I've earned the PTO as per contract.
    – Dustybin80
    Dec 5, 2022 at 16:26
  • 2
    @Dustybin80 Thanks for answering. My contract does not say I can't take PTO off during notice. Do you mean I should give notice period now (after new contract is signed), then take PTO off, then come back and complete my notice period? I work for an American company although I am not American. To sum it up: in my case PTO is two weeks, notice period is three weeks
    – fajogax665
    Dec 5, 2022 at 16:33
  • 7
    Please add a country tag. PTO and notice periods are handled wildly different between countries and someone answering from their country's perspective might give you the wrong advice for your country, although in good faith because it is correct advice for their country.
    – nvoigt
    Dec 5, 2022 at 18:15
  • 1
    @nvoigt Added country tag. Thanks for commenting
    – fajogax665
    Dec 6, 2022 at 2:39
  • @fajogax665 Have I misunderstood. Are you saying you have 2 weeks notice period so your notice will end before your PTO was due to start? If that is the case I have previously told my new employer that I have a holiday booked for these dates, they have then allowed me to take them as holiday. I know PTO works differently in the US though.
    – Dustybin80
    Dec 6, 2022 at 9:33

7 Answers 7

15

I think this is a very common situation and if there is nothing in your contract against taking PTO during your resignation period then you should be fine. The question pay now be whether or not you get paid for that time off but that will be determined by the companies PTO policy.

If you want to remain as above board as possible, set the start date for your new position for 3 weeks after you return from PTO. The new company should understand your situation and appreciate your ethics in wanting to the right thing for your soon-to-be former employer.

7
  • 3
    What may happen is that your current company may decide they don't actually need you for the whole 3 weeks after you return from PTO. They may let you go earlier, in which case you can tell your new company that you are available earlier than expected. Most companies will then happily change your start date to be earlier. Dec 5, 2022 at 17:41
  • Upvoted for the second paragraph.
    – keshlam
    Dec 5, 2022 at 22:06
  • @rhoonah Thanks for your answer. When should I give notice period to my current employer? As soon as I sign a new contract (assuming it's signed before PTOs start) or when I come back from PTOs?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 6, 2022 at 2:41
  • @DJClayworth Thanks for your comment. In case I am let go earlier, should a contract addendum be signed?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 6, 2022 at 2:43
  • @fajogax665 If you are going to work 3 weeks after your PTO then I would do it after you return. That way there is no retaliation and jeopardy toward your PTO request and it still gives them the 3 weeks that you appear to want to give.
    – rhoonah
    Dec 6, 2022 at 17:44
6

If you’re concerned about burning bridges then you could offer to cancel your PTO during your notice period (if they happen to overlap). Just make sure it will get paid out if you’re unable to take it before leaving.

4

Let's suppose I receive that job offer. Should I ask my new employer a start date further in the future explaining approved PTO and then sign that contract? This means I would need more time before starting at the new job because PTO+Notice period.

When I interviewed at the new company PTO had not been approved. They only know about the three weeks notice period.

The three week notice period is intended to help you and your employer wrap up your current work and assist in the transition to someone who will take over your position.

Thus, make sure you are able to work the full three weeks during your notice.

That may mean the three week period only starts when you return from your PTO. Arrange the appropriate start date with your new employer.

3
  • Thanks for your answer. When should I give notice period to my current employer? As soon as I sign a new contract (assuming it's signed before PTOs start) or when I come back from PTOs?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 6, 2022 at 2:47
  • That is best for your old employer. But you don't explain anywhere why that would be best for OP? For the new employer this might actually be bad because OP will start working there at a later date.
    – quarague
    Dec 6, 2022 at 9:28
  • 1
    @quarague If I were the new employer and OP explained their reasons to me, I'd see it as a positive thing that OP is making sure to hand off their old job responsibilities fully. Because most likely, one day I'll be the old employer and I'll want the same conduct.
    – Dan C
    Dec 6, 2022 at 21:43
4

"My goal is to change jobs as soon as possible without burning bridges with anyone"

If that were true, then the obvious solution would be to not take the PTO, but I suspect that taking the PTO is part of your goal as well.

There are three things to prioritize here: 1) taking the PTO, 2) a good relationship with the current employer, 3) a good relationship with the future employer.

There is no way you can guarantee all three. With tact and honesty, you very well should be able to achieve all three, but you cannot control how people will react to your actions, so there is some degree of risk. People are not always reasonable or rational.

I see three ways you could go:

It seems, contractually, you can guarantee 1) and 3) by overlapping your PTO with your notice, but you're giving your current employer less time for a handover. They might be okay with that or they may not. It totally depends.

You can guarantee 1) and 2) by taking your PTO and serving your notice sequentially, delaying your start at the new company. They very well may not care - employers have to be flexible about start dates anyway - but there's a small chance it might leave a bad first impression. Again, it totally depends what their expectations are.

You can guarantee 2) and 3) by not taking the time off. Serve your 3 weeks and start at the new job after it's over.

Which of these to choose depends on how you personally prioritize these things.

5
  • Thanks for answering. Let's suppose new company is ok with waiting 3 weeks from the moment I come back from PTO. When should I give notice to my current employer? As soon as the new contract is signed or after I come back from PTOs knowing I will be working there 3 weeks more?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 6, 2022 at 15:51
  • Any time after the new contract is signed. If you're taking PTO and then serving 3 weeks notice after you come back, giving them 5 weeks notice would be better than handing in your notice on your immediate return.
    – Michael
    Dec 6, 2022 at 15:59
  • 1
    Minor caveat: you can never fully guarantee 2. Some employers will always react negatively to turnover. And, for what it's worth, I might have listed that as priority 3 to begin with. Otherwise I think this answer best describes the situation. Hopefully a new employer will appreciate you desire to delay a start date in consideration of the current employer as an indicator you'd give them the same kind of consideration if the situation rose again in the future. Dec 6, 2022 at 21:54
  • Taking PTO and then serving your notice sequentially costs more money for your current employer. It's not necessarily a result your employer will want.
    – Brian
    Dec 9, 2022 at 20:05
  • @Michael Thanks. In case I get a final offer from a different company while being on PTO, does it make sense to give notice period to my current employer during my PTO? Or should I come back to work and then give notice?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 27, 2022 at 20:25
2

In my experience PTO use beyond a couple of hours for a medical appointment will be discouraged during the notice period especially if it is that short (2 or 3 weeks).

In general, management wants you to use the notice period to finish tasks, and document the status of those tasks. They may also want you to train a replacement if they are already onboard.

When you are directly supporting a customer, this is even more true. Those days you are gone impact their ability to recover from your leaving. Being gone for a significant amount of time would not make them happy. Your company will know if they have any contractual obligations during this transition time.

My advice is to wait until you return from vacation before giving notice.

1
  • 1
    I think any company that truly NEEDS the work of an employee during their resignation period is looking for trouble. Everyone knows that can be an unproductive time as the employee looks to the future.
    – rhoonah
    Dec 5, 2022 at 19:34
1

You give the notice so you can start when you want to start. Then your employer can act. They can accept the notice as it is. Or they can ask you to work all or some of the days that were supposed to be PTO; obviously they would have to pay the PTO AND the same pay again. And only if you agree. Or they can claim that your contract requires X working days were you actually work as notice period; in that case you and perhaps a lawyer have to look at the contract.

0

I'd sound out new company and see where they stand. For some, 5 weeks would be no big deal... for others, it's a big deal. If you can talk to the recruiter for the new job, tell them of your plan to take PTO, and hence need some extra time before accepting, and see.

Most companies ask up front to get a general sense. There can be all sorts of reasons why an employee may need a really long time between formal offer and first day. For example - immigration paperwork, relocation issues, big planned life events (weddings, medical procedures, adoptions, etc), or just the laws of the country.

As you get closer to an offer, it's more an more likely that stuff will come up - especially around major holidays, and the start date can change a bit. Before you worry - ask and see.

6
  • Thanks for your answer. When should I ask new company? Now or as soon as I get an official offer from them so that they are aware of this situation about PTOs?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 6, 2022 at 2:52
  • Now. Don't make a huge deal of it, but do it on the earlier side. This is a situation that shouldn't be a huge deal, so it's helpful to do it in a way that's casual and more like asking, and less like officially informing, since you want to see what the negotiation options are. Dec 6, 2022 at 14:43
  • Thanks for answering. Let's suppose new company is ok with waiting 3 weeks from the moment I come back from PTO. When should I give notice to my current employer? As soon as the new contract is signed or after I come back from PTOs knowing I will be working there 3 weeks more?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 6, 2022 at 15:50
  • as early as you can once you have the offer letter, it's always better to have early notice Dec 9, 2022 at 17:06
  • Thanks. In case I get a final offer from a different company while being on PTO, does it make sense to give notice period to my current employer during my PTO? Or should I come back to work and then give notice?
    – fajogax665
    Dec 27, 2022 at 20:24

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .