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I have been working for a consulting company, specifically with one of its clients. I gave my notice period to the consulting company, and I will stop working there in a couple weeks. One VP from the client company sent me a LinkedIn invitation, and he says he can write a reference for me if needed.

Should I accept his invitation? I don't want my current employer (the one I have just given notice to) to get angry. Some of my LinkedIn connections are people with power working for my current employer.

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  • @DJClayworth The one I have just given notice to
    – nidano2184
    Jan 5, 2023 at 15:29
  • @JoeStrazzere Maybe because I am interacting with its client via LinkedIn though I am leaving my employer's workspace soon?
    – nidano2184
    Jan 5, 2023 at 16:48
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    Please don't vandalise your question even if you're not happy it's been closed. Aug 24, 2023 at 15:46

5 Answers 5

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Accept as many invitations as you like. Most people are on LinkedIn. Excellent tool to keep in touch with former colleagues - even if it is only to congratulate them on a new job, for example.

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In general there is absolutely nothing wrong with maintaining connections with a previous employer or clients from previous work. As long as you abide by any agreements that you signed about working for any competition then neither the employer you are leaving nor the employer you are joining should have any objection.

In the case of the employer you are leaving, you shouldn't care whether they are angry or not. They have no reason to be angry, and they almost certainly won't be. If they are the kind of people who get angry over your continuing to talk to a client then they are not the kind of people you want to work for again.

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You should first check whether your current employer (the consulting company) has any policy on social media usage. Many companies do these days. If they do have a policy that says something explicit like, "you are expressly forbidden to connect on social media with clients / students/ regulators / whatever", which a few such policies do, then you should not violate their policy and at least wait to accept the linkedin invite until after your employment, including any garden leave, ends.

If they don't have any social media policy, then I don't see any reason why anyone would get angry at you. But if you're worried nevertheless, and if you have a reasonably good working relationship with your soon to be ex manager, then just ask them this question. I'd be very surprised if they see any problem.

You can also configure the privacy of your LinkedIn account so that your existing connection won't get notified about your new connections, although they would still see endorsements etc.

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  • LinkedIn ≠ social media. It's a place for professionals to be in touch with other professionals. No company can tell me not to be in touch with other professionals.
    – gnasher729
    Jan 12, 2023 at 11:56
  • I've seen some really... excentric company policies out there. Jan 12, 2023 at 12:25
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Should I accept his invitation? I don't want my current employer (the one I have just given notice to) to get angry. Some of my LinkedIn connections are people with power working for my current employer.

I think you are overthinking this one. Accept the invitation if you want the connection (I would).

If you are that concerned, ask your current employer first or wait until you are no longer employed there.

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I've never cared who the people I am connected to on LI are connected to. I doubt other people are any different.

I'm connected with plenty of direct competitors in the industry and so is members of the Management team.

Accept the invitation.

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