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My former manager and I did not get along for various reasons.

I've performed my role successfully based on the areas I have been accountable for.

Yet despite that, they are trying to influence my new manager by asking them to give me a poor performance review.

My new manager has told me that they disagree with my old manager's assessment of me, and will give me a positive performance review.

The issue I have is where old manager is influential and has been at the company for a long time. Where they have actively tried to influence other managers in a similar way, by back biting, and have been successful in doing so.

This has led to me being overlooked for promotions or general growth opportunities.

New manager has mentioned that there is nothing to worry about, and to follow their guidance. I am concerned that the damage has already been done, since old manager has already spoken poorly about me to other members of the leadership team, my boss's boss for example who has mixed feelings about me.

Old manager also sits on promotion panels, and I am concerned that they will be obstructive.

I am in two minds about leaving. On one hand, new manager may be able to help me improve my profile, but then I have the old manager who is constantly actively working against me.

New manager is new to this environment so influence is less at this moment in time with leadership team but could grow.

For anyone that has been in this situation, how do these situations typically play out if you decide to stay?

EDIT:

To put situation into context:

Old manager had a problem with the nature of the role itself. They were trying to change formally defined accountabilities in a coercive way, where I pushed back because I felt that it put me at a disadvantage and going against org guidelines.

New manager is much more respectful, and is assessing me based on these accountabilities , so no issues.

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    Sounds like a cultural norms might be relevant. What country?
    – Donald
    Jan 12, 2023 at 16:14
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    "My former manager and I did not get along for various reasons" What were those reasons? Some examples of how things ended up how they currently are would be helpful.
    – sf02
    Jan 12, 2023 at 16:19
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    Question: Did you do anything (and be honest) that earned your previous manager's ire? That really depends on the answer we can give. If there is a legitimate reason (even if you think it's been atoned for or you've learned from it) - then it may just be an unfornate situation that you can't get out of. However, if it's unreasonable - there may be grounds to go to HR. Jan 12, 2023 at 19:56
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    @TheDemonLord think they had a problem with the nature of the role itself. They were trying to change formally defined accountabilities in a coercive way, where I pushed back because I felt that it put me at a disadvantage and going against org guidelines. New manager is much more respectful, and is assessing me based on these accountabilities , so no issues.
    – bobo2000
    Jan 13, 2023 at 4:37
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    To expand on the above , I’ve had positive feedback over the quality of my work from several people within the org. I think their criticism is unnecessarily harsh.
    – bobo2000
    Jan 13, 2023 at 4:50

1 Answer 1

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It really depends on why the former manager and yourself did not get along, so I have to answer as an if/or way. I have seen both sides play out. The first case ended positively, the second did not:

  1. A case where someone does not put the effort in/reach out yet has the base skills needed to move to the next promotion level
  2. A case where a person was brilliant technically but had a horrible attitude which resulted in other people quitting when working under him

If the 'various reasons' includes attitude, anger outbursts, escalations, complaints, nitpicking, etc., it is really hard to overcome, because it is easy to overshadow fine work, with a horrible war story from the past.

If the 'various reasons' are purely technical/work performance, effort put into work, etc., you are fine, can simply work a little harder/better and reach the goal. Your new manager can praise your accomplishments to convince the promotion panel that your work has improved and you qualify for the promotion step.

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