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I recognize myself as an "Independent Researcher", however, I have no relevant academic degree in the field in which I research (physics, esp., relativity, and electromagnetism). I just have some articles published in peer-reviewed journals and some self-published scholarly books. Is it possible for me to find a job as a researcher? If positive, where can I find it?

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    You can always apply. Given the competition for academic positions, I wouldn't suggest it with your current lack of credentials. The usual path is to get at least a graduate degree in your field, preferably a terminal degree, working as a research assistant at the same time, and graduate with enough experience and a GPA sufficient to make someone consider keeping you on staff. There is HUGE competition for academic jobs with any significant wages.
    – keshlam
    Commented Mar 12, 2023 at 0:20
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    Note that physics, in particular, is oversupplied with amateurs who think they know what they are doing and really, really don't. That's a tough audience to impress.
    – keshlam
    Commented Mar 12, 2023 at 0:55
  • What is the cumulative impact factor of you peer review publications? The situation is different if you accidentally made it into science or nature in comparison to a conference proceeding of a local conference.
    – Sascha
    Commented Mar 12, 2023 at 10:47
  • @Sascha Do you mean the journal's impact factor? Which one is more effective, accidentally made it into science or presented in a conference proceeding of a local conference? Commented Mar 12, 2023 at 10:54
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    @MohammadJavanshiry: Yes, add up your publication impact factors. If you managed into get into decent journals without backing by an institution it may be enough to convince a principal investigator to talk to you about a collaboration or a guest visit. However, without a obtaining a PhD (later) that's most likely not going to be a career. I know of only one permanent researcher w/o phd who did a Nature paper (during his master or as a technician, not sure) who never did a phd - however that was not just any ordinary nature paper, but really groundbreaking stuff (3300 citation in 20 years).
    – Sascha
    Commented Mar 12, 2023 at 13:31

2 Answers 2

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I have no relevant academic degree in the field in which I research

Do you have any degree at all?

Is it possible for me to find a job as a researcher?

It will be very, very difficult, but anything is possible.

If positive, where can I find it?

Check with some of your network connections, perhaps the peers that reviewed your articles.

I recognize myself as an "Independent Researcher"

Does anyone else recognize you that way? If so, network with them to find places to apply for work. And then ask if you can use them as a reference.

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    Yes, I have a B.Sc. in civil engineering. Finding peers who have reviewed my articles is very hard since most of them are anonymous and the editors do not tend to reveal the reviewers' identities. Commented Mar 11, 2023 at 23:07
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The easiest way is to use your network to get a job.

An alternative is to get a job at the target company and then try and move sideways into the field you want to be. Humason was a mule driver transporting material for a telescope and ended up as an important astronomer doing groundbreaking work.

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