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I'm currently living and working on a work visa in country X. I need to move countries for family reasons, so now I'm in a process of looking for a new job in country Y. I'm not a citizen of X or Y.

Obviously, I'm only looking for positions that offer relocation to Y (not necessary relocation assistance, just the ability to work in another country), but I'm not sure how to inform my potential employer that I NEED to relocate. Most of the jobs I'm looking at offer locations in several countries including Y and remote work, but I need to be working from country Y to get a visa. Even if my hypothetical new employer does not provide financial assistance, employing a foreigner according to the labor laws of country Y is more difficult than hiring a local, so I want to bring up the topic as correctly as possible.

Is it appropriate to mention personal reasons, or the fact that if I accept the offer I will not be able to stay in my current country, or is it better to be as general as possible?

Thank you!

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    I don't understand the question. Most jobs offers are for a very specific location. It should be clear that you will relocate if you apply for a job in a different country.
    – Helena
    Commented Apr 23, 2023 at 17:07
  • Most of jobs that I'm looking at also offer remote jobs, which would be less costly for the company than relocating someone. However, I cannot work remotely.
    – sleeper
    Commented Apr 23, 2023 at 17:10
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    Why not simply apply for jobs at Y? Skips the entire confusion.
    – Aida Paul
    Commented Apr 23, 2023 at 19:05
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    @sleeper based on the update this is actually quite unique, as they would need legal presence in country Y to hire you. This is getting very tangled up, and honestly I think the only way for you will be to either start some sort of solo-business (whatever Y allows, you'll need an accountant), or look for a job at Y directly. It's very rare someone would go through the trouble of setting up presence for one potential hire.
    – Aida Paul
    Commented Apr 24, 2023 at 19:35
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    @TymoteuszPaul I'm looking exclusively for employers that have presence in country Y. Made additional edits. Sorry, I just didn't realize that this was unclear too.
    – sleeper
    Commented Apr 24, 2023 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

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I'm only looking for positions that offer relocation (not necessary relocation assistance, just the ability to work in another country), but I'm not sure how to inform my potential employer that I NEED to relocate.

Clearly, this is a necessary requirement for you.

You should make it clear in your cover letter that you will need to relocate. And if you talk with a recruiter, you should make it clear.

You don't want to waste anyone's time (neither yours nor theirs) if this isn't possible with the potential employer.

Is it appropriate to mention personal reasons, or the fact that if I accept the offer I will not be able to stay in my current country, or is it better to be as general as possible?

It makes sense to indicate "for family reasons". It will likely not be necessary to say more, unless they ask.

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    Yes, candidates should inform potential employers of any deal-breaker conditions ahead of time, not only to save time but to help us make sure the candidate is interviewing for the correct position. If a company offers remote-only positions, getting stuck interviewing for that team will ensure you don't get the job.
    – ColleenV
    Commented Apr 25, 2023 at 15:58
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How to bring up relocation during a job interview?

In the interview, you should clearly tell the interviewers that you are not located in their country and you are currently in country X, but you will move to country Y. So, you will work for them remotely from country Y.

This is a legitimate topic. So, you should be able to bring it up during the interviews to clear up any potential confusions.

BTW, if you don't want to disclose the reason you move from country X to Y, then you don't have to or you can simply tell them it is due to a family reason.


In most cases, the employers probably don't care much about whether you work for them remotely from country X or Y except for some of these situations:

  1. Their government forbid them from doing business with anyone located in country X or Y due to economic sanction, embargo, or political reasons.
  2. For tax purposes and saving costs, the companies may prefer hiring remote workers from certain countries.
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  • Working remotely in a different country can be complicated because of different legal systems and taxation, and not all employers want to go through the trouble for a single employee
    – ojs
    Commented May 1, 2023 at 17:48

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