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I have been working in a very part-time role for a company for 2 years. It's well paid for the small number of hours (teaching a couple classes a week in a subject in which I have an advanced degree). Recently, I found out that a colleague is leaving the company and I expressed interest in that position to my supervisor and her supervisor, and was told they would get back to me when the job description had been put together by the people who need to do that. While the open role doesn't require the advanced degree I have, I also need to earn a living, and this would be a full-time job in the industry. (It's unlikely I could get a full-time job that required the advanced degree without moving, which is not something I want to do so I don't disrupt my family.) Yesterday, I saw the opening posted on Indeed, and they had never gotten back to me internally.

It's demoralizing that they didn't get back to me about this opening before or at the same time as posting it publicly. I wonder if they think I am not qualified for the position or even overqualified because they only see a small part of what I do. The qualifications for the position are all things that I have done in other places, even if I haven't had the exact same job title. I also wonder if they don't really "get" that they can't expect me to happily continue my part time role indefinitely while I see other people get full-time salaries with benefits. It's not a choice for me between this role and a more senior role that requires the advanced credential somewhere else, it's a choice for me between this role (or one like it) and the financial insecurity of patching together part-time jobs.

My gut instinct is to just accept that I'm not their top pick for the open role, I won't be happy there, and look for a full-time role elsewhere (and leave the part-time role there if needed). But I'm reluctant to break things off with an organization that, if not perfect (who is?), has been a decent place to work. So, I'm trying to decide if I should say something to them again. What should I say? Are there any other ways I should look at this situation?

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    They already have you so they would neee to fill your role afterwards. Also you are not very experienced yet, and that may be badly needed. May 12, 2023 at 13:22
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    "It's demoralizing that they didn't get back to me about this opening before or at the same time as posting it publicly" - Even if they had, you likely would have been required to submit your application, as everyone else for a variety of reasons. You shouldn't read much into it, if you didn't submit your resume (or don't plan to, there is a good chance you won't even be considered.
    – Donald
    May 12, 2023 at 13:34
  • Is it possible that this is a fake position? That they don't plan on replacing the coworker that left and are just posting the job listing as part of some other requirement May 15, 2023 at 12:17
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    I would not take this "slight" personally, the job is important to you, not anyone else involved in posting the job. Your boss may have misunderstood, been distracted, or forgot about your interest.
    – Pete B.
    May 17, 2023 at 19:34

3 Answers 3

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Just formally apply for the role, using whatever mechanism is shown in the Indeed posting. Meanwhile, continue to look for full-time jobs elsewhere.

If they consider you a good candidate for the job, you will get an interview and consideration. If not, these things happen.

Often, management and/or HR require a formal search to fill a position, even if an internal "very part-time" candidate expresses an interest. Nothing to get demoralized about here.

I also wonder if they don't really "get" that they can't expect me to happily continue my part time role indefinitely while I see other people get full-time salaries with benefits.

Perhaps they don't understand your desire for something other than "very part-time". You could try to make it clearer.

They may also be concerned that your advanced degree indicates that you will soon leave for a job that can take advantage of your degree, while this job does not. You can clarify your intent.

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Make a formal application.

You have significant advantages over prospective candidates:

  • You have no intention of moving
  • You have solid work experience
  • The company already knows you
  • (Hopefully) your performance in these last two years has been exemplary
  • You know what the position entails and what special requirements the company is looking for whereas an external job candidate may need to speculate.
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Why don't you apply to the Indeed position and then you would be a viable candidate? At that point they would have to call you in for an interview.

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