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This is my first company and I have been working here for almost a year now. It is a small company of about thirty employees and we mostly communicate verbally than through email or other means. When I was interviewed/appointed a year ago I was asked if I would contribute to the organisation for at least two years and I said yes, (I never did sign or make any legal contract/document), but now I have an offer from another pretty big concern and this being an undeniable offer I couldn't resist but talked to my employer about leaving the concern now he refuses to give me a relieving order/letter and says I should continue to contribute for at least two more years in order to get a relieving order, (I could detect a lot of bitterness in his tone).

To add further:- I work night shifts from 9PM to 9AM. Pretty much doesn't leave home if work is pending and provide support like 24*7. I even worked lot of Sundays and practically involved myself in getting the work done. I was the go to guy for any new adventurous tasks now I feel like I've blown it all away. This is the same situation for almost everyone appointed with me but nobody tried leaving till now.

A relieving letter is a formal letter from the employer stating your work period, current CTC and stating that you are relieved from your work as of this date and so on. It is mandatory that I provide it to the new employer else I could be considered as absconded and employers will not hire me.

Is there a way I can convince the one offering a job for not being able to produce any relieving letter? will that be professional to do so?

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    What is a "relieving order"? – CincinnatiProgrammer Feb 14 '14 at 13:59
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    A formal letter from the employer stating your work period, current CTC and stating that you are relieved from your work as of this date and so on. It is mandatory that I provide it to the new employer else I could be considered as absconded and 'BLACKLISTED' too. – user15892 Feb 14 '14 at 14:03
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    What country are you from? This all sounds unfamiliar. What's this blacklisting stuff? Is some agency keeping alist? – user8036 Feb 14 '14 at 14:57
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    @Jan I am from INDIA. we have National Skill Registry which maintains records. – user15892 Feb 14 '14 at 16:05
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    What is "CTC"? You should be aware that this entire situation seems very strange to most of us who aren't familiar with practices in India. – Keith Thompson Feb 14 '14 at 21:21
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To answer the question,

"Can I choose leave my job before my two years is over?"

Just ask yourself the question,

"If it turned out that I was lazy, incompetent, and unpleasant, could my employer dismiss me before my two years is over?"

The answer is obviously yes. (If anyone knows an employer who won't, please let me know - I'd love to work for them.)

Therefore it is not reasonable to assume you are "bound" to work by a contract. Such an agreement serves as a good faith understanding that if all goes well, all parties will make their best effort to see the contract through.

Further, a contract or agreement more or less lays out:

1) What the work will be

2) At what rate the contractor will be compensated until the expiry of the contract

If you want to leave at any time, you can. I can't speak to any blacklist since these practices vary from place to place. Most of the time though, "blacklisting" is something people in weak negotiating positions say to scare you.

I would recommend you make a good faith effort to continue, and ask your employer to match the terms of the new contract.

If they do not, they have failed to make a good faith effort to keep the working relationship alive, and you may end your contract, with appropriate notice, at no risk of unprofessionalism.

  • Actually I haven't signed any contract so far(the two years was agreed verbally), so they do not hold any leverage against me. – user15892 Feb 14 '14 at 16:19
  • Do you suggest it would be better if I leave my job here in spite of leaving behind a year of experience, start as a fresher and find a better place where they would value me? – user15892 Feb 14 '14 at 17:39
  • In the sense that I am not a professional, and you should not take my advice, yes, I am advising you to do so. – Code Whisperer Feb 14 '14 at 17:58
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    I'm not sure that this answer is coming from an angle of knowledge regarding the employment situation in India. It feels like it would be good advice in Western countries. – Carson63000 Feb 14 '14 at 21:19

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