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Last week 2023-11-01, I had a second interview, and it seemed to be a good conversation; I sent a followup thank you letter and attached my cover letter.

They responded pleasantly and they'd be in touch (or similar) next week, which is now this week (2023-11-08). I recently realized the automated application did not request references and they haven't asked for them.

Should I send my references or should I wait to see if they ask?

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    Why would you send references when you haven't been asked for them? "We'll talk to you next week" means "we're interviewing other people" so don't assume you've got this job. Nov 8, 2023 at 12:10
  • I have recently observed sometime HR doesn't give the cover letter to interviewers along with resume so I think I will start sending my cover letter with interview followup, plus my references if/when the online form does not request them...
    – Parkaboy
    Nov 8, 2023 at 13:54
  • Cover letters should be sent when candidates first apply for the jobs. If they don't ask for it when you apply for the job, then you don't send it to them after the second interview. Instead, you should wait until they ask you to send it to them. (The same principle applies for sending the references). Nov 8, 2023 at 14:19
  • --Job-September: I know all this, I always send a cover letter and I have recently observed that HR only gives the resume to the interviewer, but not the cover letter, which always has additional useful detail.
    – Parkaboy
    Nov 8, 2023 at 14:58

3 Answers 3

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Should I send my references or should I wait to see if they ask?

Always wait until asked.

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    Among other things, this avoids annoying your references with your inquiries from companies which aren't really that interested in you
    – keshlam
    Nov 9, 2023 at 4:36
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    Indeed. Who wants a needy and impatient employee !
    – Nikki
    Nov 9, 2023 at 20:27
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If they didn't ask for references, you shouldn't send them. If they want your references, they will ask for them explicitly. Sending them out of the blue might be odd or confusing to the recipient, especially if they are not the one that is going to check references (if the company checks them at all).

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    References are not a universal requirement. In fact, it may be a GDPR problem if you just go ahead and send other people's private information unprompted.
    – Nelson
    Nov 8, 2023 at 12:30
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    @Nelson If you send information unprompted, I fail to see how that would be a GDPR problem. You gave explicit consent by sending it. Nov 8, 2023 at 12:31
  • If I were to send the references, the recipient or their delegate would check them.
    – Parkaboy
    Nov 8, 2023 at 13:55
  • @Parkaboy How do you know? Maybe you need to send them to a specific person or department you haven't been into contact with yet. Some companies don't do it at all, and some companies will ask you to supply your references to a third-party company to check them. Sending them prematurely is entirely unnecessary, and could lead to communication errors like you saying "I already sent them" when they do ask to supply them, while the recipient was the wrong one, or already deleted them because they were not necessary at that point. Nov 8, 2023 at 14:43
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Many companies now outsource reference checking to the same companies who handle the background check. They're not interested in whether 'parkaboy' is a great person; they just check the dates you worked there, your last job title, and whether they'd employ you again.

In short; don't submit references unless asked. They'll probably be ignored anyway.

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  • Interesting the wide range of responses. Thank you everyone. I haven't sent anything and am now waiting to see what happens.
    – Parkaboy
    Nov 8, 2023 at 14:59
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    @Parkaboy There is no wide-range of responses, all answers up to now say you shouldn't send them yet. Nov 9, 2023 at 9:09

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