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I have worked for a big tech company for about 6 years. In that time, I’ve been promoted from a lower-mid-level position to a high-level IC position. This is commonly known as “senior staff engineer” or level 7 in the F/G leveling system, it’s two promotions past senior engineer.

In this time I have never done an interview or even replied to a recruiter's email. If I were to look for a new job, what could I expect to differ in the interview process?

When I was hired I went through a typical software engineering loop: coding/algorithm questions, an architecture question, and a behaviors interview.

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    VTC - Whilst there are some similarities in Interview process - I feel this question is too broad to be answerable. Things like physical location, company culture, company policy, desperation, candidate pool etc. all feed into the job selection process. Commented Dec 17, 2023 at 19:51
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    What does "IC" stand for ? Commented Dec 18, 2023 at 3:34
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    @Job_September_2020, IC stands for Individual Contributor. honehq.com/glossary/individual-contributor Commented Dec 18, 2023 at 7:50
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    @senten, Your question is too broad for this format. You should really visit the discussion forums on TeamBlind and on Leetcode. Commented Dec 18, 2023 at 7:52
  • @StephanBranczyk Thanks; at my last job, IC stood for Integration Consultant.
    – shoover
    Commented Dec 18, 2023 at 19:52

2 Answers 2

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I have worked for a big tech company for about 6 years. In that time, I’ve been promoted from a lower-mid level position to a high-level IC position. This is commonly known as “senior staff engineer” or level 7 in the F/G leveling system, it’s two promotions past senior engineer.

All those titles, levels, and naming systems are the ones your company uses. The companies I have worked for have their own set of names, and promotion methods.

If I were to look for a new job, what could I expect to differ in the interview process?

I have had multiple rounds of interviews when switching projects within the same company. In other cases I have had a single interview before getting an offer from a new company.

When I was hired I went through a typical software engineering loop: coding/algorithm questions, an architecture question, and a behaviors interview.

Everybody does it differently. This was even true before the health crisis. I have seen 3 interviews after the so called final interview. I have seen decisions made after one zoom call. I have never experienced a behaviors interview. I have never had an interview with HR where they asked questions. Every session with HR was for them to explain the benefits package to convince a potential employee that the benefits are great.

If you want to apply to other jobs: Do so. If you get to the interview stage you will see the wide range of methods.

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From experience and avoiding things that can be specific to your company/country.

It differs, not a lot, but enough. At this level, companies will still have some code question to make sure you keep up to date on new stuff (or are not rusty).

They will start to focus more on your ability to manage rather than to code (since at this point you clearly know how to code) questions like "Can you mentor ?","How would you support a junior developer ?" will eventually pop up, and you can always say that you would rather not teach juniors (not everyone can/wants to do it).

Besides that, they expect you to be reliable and not make mistakes while helping others, be it managing, or teaching.

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