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I know it may sound negative, but how could it not be when you open your LinkedIn feed and 7 out of 10 posts are about layoffs and people being without jobs for months?

First and foremost, allow me to introduce myself. I've been working as a mobile developer for approximately 9 years, specializing in developing large-scale applications within the financial market. From 2019 to 2022, I experienced a peak in my career—I was promoted to the position of Specialist, akin to a tech lead. I initially started as a Junior in 2018, and, of course, this came with a significant salary increase.

However, 2022 and 2023 were not as favorable, to be honest. The market experienced a collapse, and I am struggling to identify opportunities for improvement. It feels like the available job options are insufficient. I sense that I am no longer growing professionally in my current role, yet I find it challenging to let go because alternative opportunities seem scarce.

I've spent the last 3 days searching for a job, and it's making me more pessimistic. It's not just the recent market collapse we've witnessed, but the technology itself is changing. Mobile development is undergoing significant changes, with hybrid technologies gaining momentum, and platforms like Flutter and React becoming more stable. While as developers, we understand the need to learn new things every day, but thinking about that is driving me crazy.

I find myself stuck in a job where I seem to do nothing every day, despite enjoying a significant salary and facing an uncertain future.

The landscape of AI, ML, and hybrid technologies is changing rapidly, and job opportunities seem scarce. I'm uncertain about what the coming months will bring, but it doesn't seem promising.

I'm eager to hear from others who may be facing a similar situation. I'm interested in learning how people handle these challenges, if others are going through the same experiences as me, and gaining insights into their perspectives on the future. Additionally, I'd appreciate advice on areas to focus on and potential strategies for improvement.

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    I think you're overreacting. Layoffs are news; they get reported as such and appear more common as a result. "Veeblefetzer still employs 1307 programmers" is not news. Also, if you are willing to come to the office rather than working remotely, there are a lot of software executives right now who would love to see more people in their building, especially younger and lower-paid people; there's the question of who is being laid off. Yes, the industry is evolving, but that's nothing new.
    – keshlam
    Jan 24 at 5:40
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    Bubble has popped, the smart people are learning an instrument or sharpening up other skills
    – Kilisi
    Jan 24 at 7:04
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    I think you are exaggerating a bit. But some part is right, things are changing - but are always changing - and the most right thing you mentioned is, we do not know what is going to be next, and you are not in control of it either. So for everything in life in general, you do not know if will be good or bad.
    – Worker
    Jan 24 at 7:26
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    This feels like an invitation for a chat rather than a question with a specific goal we can address here.
    – Saes
    Jan 24 at 9:09
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    @Donald, The software industry isn't shrinking, it is moving from certain large companies to many other companies. In my opinion, it was not the WFH that was inefficient but the "empire building" by managers in certain large companies that let them get away with it. The companies are facing an economic downturn and tightening up because they had gotten bloated. WFH can be very efficient when managed properly.
    – David R
    Jan 24 at 15:46

2 Answers 2

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Mobile development is undergoing significant changes, with hybrid technologies gaining momentum, and platforms like Flutter and React becoming more stable. While as developers, we understand the need to learn new things every day, but thinking about that is driving me crazy.

Tech changes fast. It always has, and it always will. And that's especially true for fields like mobile development, because it tends to emphasise using the latest shiny things rather than long-term stability and support. If you're not constantly learning these new technologies, and taking advantage of the new ways of working (such as the new "AI driven" tools) then you're quickly going to fall behind and your skillset will become obsolete.

If that's something that you don't want to be doing any more, then you should look at moving out of mobile development into another field that doesn't require it as much. Other areas of development move much slower, especially in the enterprise space, where people value stability over newer tech. Hell, there's still people who make a good living writing COBOL. Or maybe you can pivot within your field into a role that requires less hands-on coding (management, architecture, etc).

I find myself stuck in a job where I seem to do nothing every day, despite enjoying a significant salary and facing an uncertain future.

Use that time to invest in yourself learn the new skills you need to stay up to date.

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  • Right, poke around and other options can be found. I taught programming for a while, and considered work as a traveling trainer. If you're smart and answer questions well, you can probably ace an interview, although I know that getting an interview is tough. Jan 24 at 22:24
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This is not the first time this has happened.

Back in March of 2000 the dot-com bubble burst. It was horrible and lots of companies went under and lots of people lost their jobs. Yet with enough time the Internet and tech industry recovered from it.

This is no different though things are/will be different. There will be new technology involved, new companies, and new ways of doing things, but at the end of the day there will still be jobs that need people to perform them.

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  • The dot-com bubble only directly affected a fairly small part of the industry, though.  There were — and are! — countless developers working away in banks and financial companies, in industrial control systems, in consumer devices, in telecomms infrastructure, in various branches of science, and in umpteen other areas pretty much untouched.  Web development may have been one of the most visible area 20 years ago — as mobile development may be today — but don't mistake either of them for ‘the tech industry’.
    – gidds
    Jan 24 at 17:25

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