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I worked in my past software company with the designation of "software engineer" for 2 1/2 years in the database department. Recently, I switched to the new company. Myself and an employee are working in a software company in which recently I started working. Now, in this new company, they have given me the designation as "software analyst" but they said that the work will be on databases only.

Now my question is this: What will happen if the job role/designation changes? Will it effect my career in the future anywhere, like in another company?

closed as unclear what you're asking by jcmeloni, Rhys, user8365, Adam V, enderland Feb 28 '14 at 15:57

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    Hi and welcome to the site, unfortunately it isn't very clear what your question is that you want us to answer. Would you mind clarifying please? – Rhys Feb 28 '14 at 13:56
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What will happen if the JOB ROLE/DESIGNATION Changes?

Job Titles often don't reflect the work you actually perform. The work performed by a "Programmer", "Software Engineer", "Software Analyst", "Database Engineer", and even "Database Analyst" might or might not be identical.

Additionally, Job Titles are often meaningful only within a company (and sometimes only within a division or department).

An "Analyst" in one company may perform the identical work as an "Engineer" in another company. That seems to be the case in your situation. When my company was acquired by a much larger company a few years ago, everyone on my team went from "Engineer" to "Analyst" overnight, in order to conform to the corporate job designation system and fit within the designated pay scales. The work they performed before and after was identical.

Make sure your resume not only includes your title, but also fully describes the work you actually perform. Experienced hiring managers understand how this works, and will not be confused by different titles which essentially mean the same thing.

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    Great answer. I wish I could upvote it more than once. – Spidey Mar 4 '14 at 4:00

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