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Well i don't know is this right place to ask or not but i wanted to know how can i make resume show everything, done even a bit task also.

As we don't have proofs every time for what we have done,sometimes we have knowledge but no project in that area.or experience.

Eg: a computer engineer can be of any field Either Networking , Either Software ,or hardware also for a basic engineer ,if he has done mastery in software field he might have also gained knowledge in hardware also but he don't have proof for that, also in software field a computer engineer can be a designer or a programmer or any other .but sometimes it shows negative impact to show that the person is good at both designing and programming

So how can an effective resume be written so that it reflects everything in every area.with proper highlights.

thanks .

closed as too broad by enderland, Monica Cellio, jmac, CMW, Michael Grubey Mar 30 '14 at 12:57

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • "Your questions should be reasonably scoped. If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much..." (help center) – gnat Mar 27 '14 at 18:02
  • yeah i know,i m asking too much but thats all i wanted to know :( – user3094300 Mar 27 '14 at 18:04
  • Downvoter please comment for downvotes.Do you think its not a good question or somebody can't have questions like this please do suggest me where should i go to ask where i don't get negative votes for my question. – user3094300 Mar 27 '14 at 18:41
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From my experience, an effective resume does 2 things:

  • Gets past the software screen by utilizing the keywords that the company is looking for. Typically they list these on the job posting. If your posting to a site like Dice than use Google AdWords to get as many of the different keywords in the resume as possible for the position you want.
  • Gets you in front of (or on the phone with) a hiring manager at the company. I find that a lot of hiring managers hear a lot about what a person can do. List what you HAVE done. On my LinkedIn profile (as an example), I put verbatim "I am a huge fan of knowledge in general. That being said, actions speak louder than words. I post the majority of my larger projects that I work on here."

In summary, include the keywords in a creative way that gets you past the software without being obvious that was your intentions. Use your actual experiences to reinforce the fact that you not only know something but, more importantly, know how to implement it. The point of the resume is not to get you the job but to get you the interview.

Also leave some things for the interview to shock and awe the potential employer. Something that will make you stand above and beyond the people that were interviewed for that position that they would not have expected when inviting you to the interview. This keeps you on their mind during the hiring process.

This is just my experience, I am sure there is far better answers but I have been rather successful at getting jobs even though I am horrible at interviewing.

  • yeah i liked the way you said ,but tell me PaulDonny would it be not negative for the interviewer that the person knows about so many fields ,that can simply show that person is not focused towards one thing,like in my case i know designing and programming both.so would it be ? – user3094300 Mar 27 '14 at 18:08
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    Well, the issue then becomes why are you going after x position and not y position. For example, I am in QA. I have experiences that would be better suited for the roles of PM,BA,SA or Developer (if your unfamiliar with these roles, they are typically considered higher level more prestigious roles). When asked why I am in QA with these qualifications, it's because I am passionate about and love my position. If you have a good, honest reason why you are going after x with the experience of y, than list it. If the reason is because 'Its easier' leave it off. – Paul Muir Mar 27 '14 at 18:12
  • thanks @PaulDonny i got you point ,exactly what i wanted (y). – user3094300 Mar 27 '14 at 18:15
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An effective resume will highlight what the hiring manager is looking for, in the 30 seconds they use to glance over it. It must quickly catch their eye that you are a potential person to interview.

So your resume should NOT be a wall of text, including everything that you've done. It should have easy to read bullet points that quickly show your relevent experience for that particular job, appropriate accomplishments and benefits you've provided to your current and previous employers, and appropriate education. It should not be gimmicky, but be clean and clear.

The purpose of the cover letter and resume is to get the interview. You can go into more depth in the interview.

  • how to mention as you said.."accomplishments and benefits you've provided to your current and previous employers, and appropriate education." – user3094300 Mar 27 '14 at 17:58

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