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I have just left a job as a network administrator from a office that was becoming a "toxic" environment. Within the last six months, half the front office has left. My environment also was becoming "unhealthy" due to senior management and changes to work that I was neither trained for or interested in doing. I've taken a job within the last month and it was promised to me during the interviews with the employment agency and the company that my job would not change from what was on the job description.

Since starting, I haven't been doing what was promised and I've talked to the employment agency and my supervisor. My supervisor informed me that the job description was "old" and that the job is "break/fix" with maybe some of the network administration put into it. There is a lot of work required in both areas and I can make a lot of improvements as a network administrator as I was hired for.

Should I be looking right away or give it a bit of time? I'm not going to be happy doing what they have me doing but I'm afraid of "job hopping".

closed as off-topic by gnat, jcmeloni, Michael Grubey, IDrinkandIKnowThings, jmac May 15 '14 at 4:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking advice on what job to take, what skills to learn, etc. are off-topic as the answers are rarely useful to anyone else." – jcmeloni, IDrinkandIKnowThings, jmac
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • possible duplicate of New job, unexpected job description change – gnat May 12 '14 at 12:29
  • Hey Jerry, and welcome to The Workplace. As explained in our help center, asking us what you should do isn't a great fit for our site because that is something you have to decide. I'm going to put it on hold, but if you can edit it so that it meets the guidelines for the site, it will be reviewed automatically by the community. Thanks in advance! – jmac May 15 '14 at 4:12
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There are really two questions here so will break it up.

Should I be looking right away?: If you are not happy with doing the Break/Fix and want to work more as a classic Network Administrator than I would communicate that to your manager that fact. You could say something like "As I mentioned before I really want to be a Network Admin and not break/fix, so do you see a way this role becomes that?" IF they say yes, then great, and really try to get distinct timing/goals of when. If not, the most professional thing you can do is to clearly communicate that you really want to be a network administrator and will work with them on a transition period. Always a good idea to leave on good terms.

Would leaving so soon be job hopping?: It sort of depends on your overall resume. If you have a long list of under 2 years jobs, this will look like more of the same. If you had a long period at your prior job, you will definitely get the benefit of the doubt. One short-term stint does not make you a job hopper. Telling the story that you left so soon because the role was not what was originally detailed is a fine reason to leave as long as you can give specifics.

  • Once when I was looking to hire someone, we got a resume that showed three months at one job, a month at another, six months at another, etc. The longest he'd ever stayed at a job was one year. And I and my boss, reviewing the resumes, were saying to each other, We don't know if he's a bad employee for some reason and gets fired, or if he gets bored easily and quits, but if we hire him, we KNOW he's going to be gone in a few months. Let's try to find someone who might stick around. On the other hand, if your resume shows 4 years here, 5 years there, 1 month, 10 years, etc., I think any ... – Jay May 12 '14 at 13:40
  • ... any employer will say, Okay, he made a mistake on that one job, no big deal. – Jay May 12 '14 at 13:41
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You've been around for a month, so the only damage to you that I see from your leaving ASAP after you get an offer from somebody else is say a two-month gap in your resume, which should not be hard for you to explain away.

Follow-up comment from @Jay "I don't see why all the downvotes on this one. It's plausible. I once had a job I only held for a month and then quit. I don't even list it on my resume. On my resume I give month and year I started and ended each job, and the way the dates fell out, I show one job ending in August and the next starting in September, so anyone reading the resume might not even realize there's a gap in there. Is this dishonest? I don't think so. No one ever asked, and if they did I'd give an honest answer. But you're under no obligation to volunteer information that may reflect poorly on yourself"

If I were on a job for a month or less, I'd easily consider my status "as still looking", especially if I was cranking out resumes after hours. I have been on jobs where I decided I had to get out of there within a week. If the CEO and his underlings are ethically and developmentally challenged and the company is on the eve of destruction, it doesn't usually come out at the interview. You don't get to see the skeletons rattling in the closet until you're given the key to the room. If someone has something to hide, things always look different to you when you are on the outside than when you get to the inside.

I'd say listing a job that I held just long enough to transition to another one is a waste of resume space at best. At worst, this listing is just counterproductive because the interviewer will rightfully demand an explanation. And there is just no winning way for me to say that I quit because that workplace was crummy. I may not look like it, but I don't care to get nailed for telling the truth. I don't enjoy martyrdom and I have a distinct preference for not getting nailed :)

  • I don't see why all the downvotes on this one. It's plausible. I once had a job I only held for a month and then quit. I don't even list it on my resume. On my resume I give month and year I started and ended each job, and the way the dates fell out, I show one job ending in August and the next starting in September, so anyone reading the resume might not even realize there's a gap in there. Is this dishonest? I don't think so. No one ever asked, and if they did I'd give an honest answer. But you're under no obligation to volunteer information that may reflect poorly on yourself. – Jay May 12 '14 at 13:46
  • @Jay I incorporated your comment into my answer, and I replied to it :) – Vietnhi Phuvan May 12 '14 at 14:08

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