1

I am currently employed but have been seeking new software engineering opportunities. I have two opportunities progressing at equal speed. I have done phone interviews with both and they both want me on site next week.

Company A is a top 10 USA tech company, I have a close friend that works there, and is probably my dream job.

Company B is a smaller (500 employee) company that designs a niche product, and has generally poor employee reviews on glassdoor. I am less interested in the opportunity, but believe it to still be an improvement over my current situation.

Would it be crazy to interview 9-12 with company A, and 1-5 with company B on the same day? It would be beneficial in that I'd only need to miss one day of work, but would it be too mentally draining? Should I just completely blow off company B so I can put all efforts into company A?

closed as primarily opinion-based by IDrinkandIKnowThings, Justin Cave, gnat, Telastyn, jmac May 30 '14 at 7:01

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 9
    There is no realistic way for anyone but you to know what would be too mentally draining for you. Some folks would have fun doing a full day of technical interviews, others would be exhausted after 2 hours. Only you know where you're likely to fall on that spectrum. It's also unclear how passing on B would improve your chances with A. Unless you're trying to cut short your time with A to make time to get to B... – Justin Cave May 29 '14 at 17:20
  • 5
    First, the times are approximate: 12 could easily spill into 12:30 or 1. So your time buffer between interviews could turn out to be smaller than you bargained for. Can you deal with that when it happens? Second, what are the chances that you are mentally sturdy enough that a bad interview performance in the morning wouldn't cascade into your afternoon interview performance? – Vietnhi Phuvan May 29 '14 at 17:20
  • Thanks for replies all. Regarding passing on B, the tools and languages used for each company are different. For Company A I will be asked questions about kernel hacking in C, company B is application design in C++. Hard to prepare for such different topics at the same time. – kludgeypi May 29 '14 at 17:39
2

This question is a bit subjective, but here are some hopefully concrete issues that might arise.

  • The first interview could go well and they want to take you to lunch. Just because the time frame is 9-12 doesn't mean they will stick to it.
  • As you mentioned you could be tired from the first interview.
  • The first job could make you an offer on the spot and assuming this is your dream job, you would have to cancel you on site with a moments notice (not that a day before is much better, but I think it is more reasonable to decline a day in advance).
  • The second could change their timeframe on short notice and if you are flexible you can adjust, if you have the other interview before you wouldn't be able to adjust and come in at say 11:30 instead.
  • I wonder if, rather than straight-out cancelling the second interview, it might be better to tell them you've been given an offer for your dream job and you'd be greatly unlikely to accept an offer from them, but would still be willing to come in for the interview / a chat if they so wish (putting the ball in their court regarding how to proceed). – Dukeling May 29 '14 at 23:28
  • Even if the first job makes an offer on the spot, you don't need to accept on the spot, and you probably should still go to the second interview that afternoon. – Carson63000 May 30 '14 at 4:15

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.