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I'm considering a new job, I'm a front-end developer, specialized in JavaScript, at least for now.

I've found an opening for a web tools programmer, but I’m not quite sure what it means.

The description is the same as any web related job :

  • Compile and understand IT development needs and their feasibility in an effort to serve the interests of the production teams;
  • Suggest enhancements by designing and implementing new systems;
  • Validate and verify whether the newly developed systems meet project intentions and are coherent with the current system and optimize whenever required;
  • Support the functions and systems designed for production;
  • Determine and correct the bugs identified by other working units and the quality control team;
  • Document the work in order to transfer knowledge and enable users in other working units to understand the new system and functions;
  • Carry out all other related tasks.

As well as the skills:

  • Extensive knowledge of JavaScript
  • Knowledge of CSS3
  • Knowledge of HTML5
  • Knowledge of TypeScript an asset
  • Knowledge of C# and .Net Framework an asset
  • Knowledge of the NoSQL database an asset
  • Knowledge of SignalR an asset

So, if anyone of you guys is a web tools programmer or know what a web tools programmer is, it would be really cool to tell me about an average day for this job.

What would one be doing? How much would one be paid for doing it?

closed as off-topic by Jim G., jmac May 30 '14 at 7:15

  • This question does not appear to be about the workplace within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Questions seeking advice on job-specific requirements, or expectations of a certain job title should be directed to the hiring manager or person in charge of the job posting. Questions that address only a specific company or position are of limited use to future visitors. – jmac May 30 '14 at 7:15
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First, you are correct to be a bit befuddled by a listing like this. I mean, what the heck does “Web Tools Programmer” mean anyway?

What happens is instead of an employer simply saying, “Hey we need a good front-end web developer with JavaScript, CSS & HTML skills…” they puff the listing up a bit to explain what your job encompasses in details that that a non-web developer might understand a bit more. And the “web tools” could simply mean a WordPress install that a company needs maintained.

And in general the best way to parse a job description like this is to look at the specific requirements; emphasis is mine:

  • Extensive knowledge of JavaScript
  • Knowledge of CSS3
  • Knowledge of HTML5
  • Knowledge of TypeScript an asset
  • Knowledge of C# and .Net Framework an asset
  • Knowledge of the NoSQL database an asset
  • Knowledge of SignalR an asset

And you see those “an asset” qualifiers? It means that it would be nice if you knew that, but past that you should be fine without it. Meaning the requirements are really:

  • Extensive knowledge of JavaScript
  • Knowledge of CSS3
  • Knowledge of HTML5

And the importance is clearly from top to bottom which is made very clear by the first qualifier of “Extensive knowledge of JavaScript.” And honestly, it is rare to find someone who has extensive knowledge of JavaScript who does not know CSS3 or HTML5.

So consider this position right up your alley as a JavaScript developer.

As far as a typical day goes, it would basically be in meetings & coding websites using JavaScript, CSS & HTML. Regarding the broader specifics at the top go, my comments in bold:

  • Compile and understand IT development needs and their feasibility in an effort to serve the interests of the production teams; (Be a part of the team & perform your job as a developer.)
  • Suggest enhancements by designing and implementing new systems; (They clearly have a codebase in place & want to make sure you do not feel tied down to their systems. Feel free to create new tools to get the job done.)
  • Validate and verify whether the newly developed systems meet project intentions and are coherent with the current system and optimize whenever required; (Basically quality assurance on the existing systems & new ones. If something does not work, you should fix it.)
  • Support the functions and systems designed for production; (Systems are in place right now & you should be ready to support their use. Changing of these systems might not be as clear cut as they seem since others are using them.)
  • Determine and correct the bugs identified by other working units and the quality control team; (Work with others to improve systems & be open to their feedback.)
  • Document the work in order to transfer knowledge and enable users in other working units to understand the new system and functions; (Simply provide documentation for work done so you are not the only one doing work. This is a good sign. It means you are part of a team & there is an understanding that your role will be confined to code creation & supporting others in using your code.)
  • Carry out all other related tasks. (This seems quite vague, but is a catchall that basically says of there are tasks related to the above and you need to handle them.)
  • Thanks a lot for your answer (and your edit). I did applied for a front-end job before this one, for the same company. But they've closed the department and redirect me to this openning. That's why I'm a bit confused. For them, it's a different job than front-end developer. In fact, the end of the line would be your first line. What is a web tools programmer? – YoannM May 30 '14 at 4:27
  • @YoannM "What is a web tools programmer?" An odd title for a web developer that mist likely came to be because if organizational restructuring or politics. Apply for it. – JakeGould May 30 '14 at 4:34
  • You mean, they probably just create the naming? That would be odd, as it's a major development company. I did applied though. – YoannM May 30 '14 at 4:44
  • @YoannM Coming up with odd names for basic jobs in the tech world is quite common. This is a title describing a role in their company. I am sure once you are there the concept that you are basically a web developer will be conveyed in some way. – JakeGould May 30 '14 at 4:47
  • I would just add that I have seen the "Web Tools Developer" moniker applied to positions in which one is developing web applications used internally in a business, hence the term "web tools". Obviously this is not universal but is the most common definition in my experience. – phoebus May 30 '14 at 19:26

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