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I am currently employed as the only web developer at a small development and marketing company. I develop the websites and projects for clients from start to finish utilizing mainly PHP. Unfortunately, most of the time this means I am working with WordPress since it is easier for the the clients to use.

I am interested in another position as a PHP developer working with different technologies that I am somewhat unfamiliar with. However, the posting explicitly states that passion is more important than experience. I have two years of experience so far and I really want to acquire new and different knowledge, so I believe I could be a good fit for this position.

Now, with the back story out of the way, I have a question regarding my cover letter.

  • Would it be acceptable, beneficial, or bad to mention my current job in my cover letter? The context would be somewhat like "I've learned a lot at my current position but I am seeking a position that will offer more learning opportunities and chances for growth and experience."
  • Would this reflect negatively on me? Or would it reflect positively as I am leaving a comfortable position to expand my knowledge and experience?
  • In addition, I began my current position as an intern doing busy work like changing passwords, and in my time there I have assumed the responsibility of and eliminated the need for multiple individuals we once outsourced to. Is this something I could add to my cover letter, resume, or should I just save it for conversation?

I am overall new to the cover letter thing and job seeking in general, but I believe I've outgrown my current position that started as an internship. I'm just trying to reflect my passion and desire in my cover letter, but am having some difficulties at this point.

Thanks

  • why not? I suppose if you work for the CIA you may be obligated to not name your current employer, but in general you can talk about your job. – emory Aug 6 '14 at 22:35
  • I have never provided a cover letter without mentioning my current job responsibilities. – Roger Aug 7 '14 at 3:10
  • @emory I just wanted to ensure I don't come across as someone who will abandon a future job (or come across negative in any way), while still somehow trying to incorporate my experience so far. I'm new to the whole job hunting politics. – user25983 Aug 7 '14 at 3:11
  • @Roger, how do you present it? Do you simply talk about how what you are doing now applies to the potential position? – user25983 Aug 7 '14 at 3:12
  • Yes, that has always been my approach. The cover letter is your chance to discuss the skills that you've gained and how they make you a great fit for the position. – Roger Aug 7 '14 at 10:28
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Would it be acceptable, beneficial, or bad to mention my current job in my cover letter?

It's perfectly reasonable to mention your current job in your cover letter.

It works best when you can talk about how the experience you have gained in your current job makes you particularly suited for the new job.

And keep the tone positive - don't bad-mouth your current company. Potential employers don't want to hear that; it makes them feel like you would do the same to them.

Would this reflect negatively on me? Or would it reflect positively as I am leaving a comfortable position to expand my knowledge and experience?

You'll almost certainly be asked why you want to leave your current company. As long as you have a good answer, it's not usually necessary to provide the details in your cover letter. Leaving a comfortable position won't necessarily be seen as a positive. Don't give a potential employer a reason to think about why you'll leave them.

In addition, I began my current position as an intern doing busy work like changing passwords, and in my time there I have assumed the responsibility of and eliminated the need for multiple individuals we once outsourced to. Is this something I could add to my cover letter, resume, or should I just save it for conversation?

You could add this. But it would probably be wasted there unless it ties in directly with the duties of the new job.

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    That all makes sense. I surely would not bad mouth! I'm just new to this process so I was wondering what is the best route to take. I won't bother mentioning any details I suppose, but will mention my current employment as it is in the exact same field. Thanks for the guidance. – user25983 Aug 7 '14 at 3:09

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