9

I took my current job as a senior-level position, but I am also a manager with several subordinates.

Much like government (and military) positions, my pay grade (senior) is different from my job description (manager). This is essentially a "stretch goal." They hire me in as a senior, make sure I can handle the next level, and the expectation is I will be promoted so my pay grade and job description match.

In the meantime, should I describe myself as a manager in contexts such as LinkedIn? I do manage 5-10 people and am included in management meetings and decisions. But I have the pay of a senior level worker and do some "worker bee" work.

If it matters, I am not looking to change employers, so this is irrelevant to my situation in the context of a job search. This is entirely about the most accurate way to represent my job role to the public.

I did find some related questions, but nothing quite like my situation:

How do I choose an appropriate job title?

How to label inaccurate job titles on resume

  • What is your job title? You say your description is manager but you didn't say what your title was and what is wrong with using it. Or is your title "Senior"?? – Brandin Aug 9 '14 at 18:34
  • I was being intentionally vague given I know people who use this site. The important thing is I am one step down from the manager level. – user16626 Aug 9 '14 at 20:53
  • Ok then just use your real title theres nothing to gain by inflating your title to something it isn't as @ . See @JoeStrazzere 's answer – Brandin Aug 9 '14 at 22:02
  • @Brandin that is why I accepted his answer. I thought about it for a while and it makes the most sense and is lowest risk. – user16626 Aug 9 '14 at 22:03
10

In the meantime, should I describe myself as a manager in contexts such as LinkedIn? I do manage 5-10 people and am included in management meetings and decisions. But I have the pay of a senior level worker and do some "worker bee" work.

You aren't a "Manager" so you shouldn't say that you are. You should indicate that you are a "Senior" with some additional (managerial) responsibilities.

In more formal contexts such as LinkedIn, a resume, an interview, etc - you indicate your actual title, and can describe the kind of work you do - including the managerial responsibilities you perform.

That will give the correct picture of your actual work, and it won't be misleading in any way.

1

The only thing a prospective employer or a recruiter are interested in is the duties you performed. Because it is the duties that you performed that give them guidance as to whether you can meet their needs. Not your pay grade.

Be plain. Describe your duties as a manager, and be done with your description. It's that simple.

1

You shouldn't mis-represent your actual title in the company - for sites like LinkedIn and other professional forms and venues, use the title that you currently hold, even if it doesn't match your work responsibilities.

That being said, do mention those responsibilities. Make a point of listing them somewhere so that people know what you can do, and if that position is your goal then list it as such.

But more importantly, don't be too worried about your title/actualjob discrepancy - this happens all the time in the workforce. People are hired in at the position that the company has open, with the HR-approved requirements for that position, and wind up doing the job that's needed, which doesn't always match what was advertised.

In short: Don't lie about your actual job title when asked, but there should be somewhere on LinkedIn and other similar sites where you can list actual workplace responsibilities.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy