1

I just got an e-mail from an old friend asking for an 'introductory request' for someone I know.

The thing is: How should I give this introduction? Like this?

to: person of interest
cc: old friend

Hi Person of Interest,

Old Friend wants to make millions with you.

Thanks,
Me

Obviously, I'm new to all this. How should I introduce someone to someone else via e-mail? Thanks in advance.

Also: Should I first ask the person of interest whether he even wants to be involved?

2

I've done this many dozens of times. Keep it simple; keep it short.

Write them both an email, with both of them on the To: line.

Hello, Kevin, meet Michael. Hello Michael, meet Kevin.

Michael, Kevin asked me to introduce you to him because he is interested in your knowledge of fly-fishing in the western Arabian peninsula (or whatever). Kevin has fished everywhere else in the world and he wants to fish there.

I am sure you two will have an interesting conversation.

Best regards,

Ollie

Helping people connect with one another is one of the best things you can do for them.

  • 1
    Also, when I think it's worth something for Kevin to connect, I tend to put a recommendation in. – Jan Doggen Aug 19 '14 at 7:36
  • Basically what I did, was ask the POI first whether he was interested (he's a pretty busy guy) and put my recommendation for the old friend there. Once he agreed, I sent an e-mail like the one above to both of them. – Bobster Aug 23 '14 at 15:08
1

This is a relatively new area as far as I'm aware - traditional introductions were largely incidental. I can't claim to know for certain how one is supposed to go about doing this, I can say what I'd do:

  1. Follow up in the original thread. Generally, the best way to make an introduction is to forward along the introductions request - after all, it should contain all the relevant information. This is a new capability afforded by introductions over e-mail and an excellent usage of the medium. You might want to check with your acquaintance in another thread to see if they feel this is appropriate or would like you to change anything about their request before passing it along.

  2. Provide a brief explanation for your involvement. Now, you don't have to pass along anything or make any introductions. Your willingness to do so is a de facto endorsement of both parties involved. I'd make sure to include how I know whoever I'm introducing, why I was willing or eager to help them make a new connection, and perhaps some brief anecdotal character and professional recommendation. You're not providing a reference, but don't leave your acquaintance with any reservations.

  3. Take ownership. Voice your approval of the introduction. Wish them the best. Promise to your support if they're having a hard time finding a time or place to meet up. You may want to take everyone to a lunch meeting. Follow up afterwards and make sure the introduction happened. Trade on your own personal reputation to help your acquaintances out. After all, you never know when you'll need a favor in return.

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