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So, technically speaking I was not demoted, but if I list my titles chronologically, it will appear that I was "downgraded" from manager to assistant team leader. This was due to an internal restructuring and happened 1-2 months ago.

I am obviously not too happy about this, and want to make sure that at my next company I return back on track on the corporate progression path.

Should I leave out the downgraded title as it has been just a few months ago? What else could I do on my resume or linkedin to make sure it doesn't come across as something reflecting my own abilities and performance?

closed as off-topic by Jim G., gnat, IDrinkandIKnowThings, Garrison Neely, David Segonds Aug 26 '14 at 9:06

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    i dont understand, is it the same tenure, e.g. you were hired at company X with position "Y" and the position was later "restructured" to be called position "Z" instead?? – Brandin Aug 22 '14 at 6:02
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    How will anyone know your role was downgraded unless you share that knowlege? A title alone does not tell anyone anything most of the time. My official title does not describe what I acutally do. – Donald Aug 22 '14 at 10:51
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    @Ramhound going from "Manager" to "Assistant Team Leader" certainly sounds like two steps back to me, and others as well I imagine - although I suppose if this is the executive team that comprises of the CEO and VP's, then it could be different. Assuming that you have been at that company for a while (and promoted up to Manager), I would write on the resume/linkedin that you "Reached Manager level" or "Worked up to Manager of x" at ACME inc. - perhaps adding in your initial position at the company as well. – user2813274 Aug 22 '14 at 14:16
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    Are you doing the same work, just a different title? – Tyanna Aug 22 '14 at 14:39
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    @user2813274 I like your comment--you should make it an answer. – Garrison Neely Aug 22 '14 at 22:17
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Going from "Manager" to "Assistant Team Leader" certainly sounds like two steps back to me, and others as well I imagine - although I suppose if this is the executive team that comprises of the CEO and VP's, then it could be different.

Assuming that you have been at that company for a while (and promoted up to Manager), I would write on the resume/linkedin that you "Reached Manager level" or "Worked up to Manager of x" at ABC, preferably adding in your initial position at the company as well. This does not specify which position you left the company with, only the rank you achieved - which is one way to throw a positive light on it.

Another way suggested by Ramhound is to write it as "Assistant Team Leader/Manager", provided it was only a change in title.

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    I really like the "Assistant Team Leader/Manager" approach, it's the simplest and cleanest way to indicate that these both mean the same role without going into detail. – Thebluefish Aug 23 '14 at 0:09
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You are asking how your resume will look to the people or computers who make an initial scan to decide whether they are interested. Once you are past the initial scan, you are talking to human being, and your detailed experience and self-presentation will be relevant -- unless something about your resume sets of an alarm bell later.

So, being complete is more important than the title dip. If you try to shade the title situation, you will either end up with a gap in time, or something that someone could see as being less than completely honest. Computer programs look for gaps. People get very exercised about apparent shading of the truth.

You can write, under the new title, 'after a restructuring in which many people received new titles, my duties were ...'

The net result will look much better than either a gap or the later discovery that you 'neglected to mention it'.

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