-3

In a follow up to my previous question, I am now on the hunt for another job.

Ideally, I would like to take a step up the career ladder as I am already in training for such a role. However, my financial position means that I could be making yet another parallel step into a similar job but with more hours/better pay. Something which does not thrill me after 10 years of doing the same type of work.

I understand that the first rule of leaving a job for financial reasons is don't say that to the potential employer so I am thinking of going down the route of "leaving a small pond to advance in a bigger one."

Would that work or could that potentially slam doors shut if come across a company just looking for someone to do the job they are hiring?

  • Having read your other question, I'm not sure why simply saying that you're leaving in order to get better pay / hours is a problem. That's actually one of the top reasons people do change jobs. – NotMe Sep 4 '14 at 14:21
  • 1
    I think the first rule of leaving a job for financial reasons is actually "Make sure you actually get paid more when it's all said and done!" i.e. don't quit your current job before you've got the offer, etc. You can talk about wanting to get more money with the new employer - this isn't fight club. – Jared Sep 9 '14 at 14:51
1

I am thinking of going down the route of "leaving a small pond to advance in a bigger one."

Would that work or could that potentially slam doors shut if come across a company just looking for someone to do the job they are hiring?

That approach can certainly work.

Many employers want to hire folks looking to get ahead. And in larger companies, hiring managers often feel that a larger company (particularly their larger company) has far more to offer in that regard, and so would be amenable to that line of reasoning.

This point of view is particularly powerful if it is the truth. It's harder to be convincing with this line of reasoning if you don't believe it. (And some of the phrases in your question seem to indicate that you don't really believe it.)

As you point out, some hiring managers aren't interested in anything other than completing the immediate tasks and a discussion about "looking to get ahead" isn't of interest. But perhaps you don't want to work for that kind of manager anyway.

0

Although I would rephrase the reason for leaving as for "professional development" or "career progression", the underlying motivation would be clear to a recruiter. It is a legitimate and indeed very common reason for leaving.

If the recruiter isn't interested in your professional aspirations then it might in fact be a good thing not to get the job.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.