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Here is my situation. I started at this position a little over 2 years ago. When I first started I was doing web development, at $40,000/yr. The company has many contracts so it's very profitable. I soon found myself doing more than that described in the job description. I started to become the web developer, database administrator and systems administrator. I decided that I wasn't being paid what I was worth and started looking for another job. I found a position that offered me $30K more with exactly the same description of what I was currently doing.

I liked the company I was working at but I wanted to be paid what I was worth. told my manager, who is also the CEO, that I received an offer for much more but that I wanted to stay at his company. He offered me $65K. I accepted the offer. That was a year ago. I have done a tremendous amount of other work since then. I helped cut out third parties companies by building applications that help the IT team (I am the only one skilled in web development) work better. Saving them money.

My supervisor, who manages the IT team department has started to take interest in web developing. He wants me to start teaching him everything I've done. He has never coded in his life and wants me to start from the very basics all the way up. You may be thinking he can't do my job and his. Well, he has a lot of down time. He has already spent many hours (at work) researching and learning the basic languages html, css, javascript and php. After giving a few lessons, he has started to take projects, he assigned to me, to work on to learn faster. I feel very uncomfortable teaching him everything. I paid for four years of school and still paying. It doesn't seem fair.

To me, it seems like the start of getting rid of me. I'm tempted to just confront him and say that I feel threatened by his interest in my projects. I can't afford to lose my job. The company is looking for its self interest. I am too. Should I confront my supervisor or go straight to my manager? Should I tell him that I feel like they are trying to get rid of me? I need advice.

closed as off-topic by Jan Doggen, Michael Grubey, Jim G., gnat, David Segonds Sep 15 '14 at 8:58

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    Get over you security issues. For heavens sake you can get another job. It is in everybody interest that one person should not be the gatekeeper of all knowledge. Consider if you are sick – Ed Heal Sep 13 '14 at 7:48
  • It's about the skills I paid for. If a doctor can train you then why go to med school? – david choi Sep 13 '14 at 7:57
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    So who trains doctors in med School. Sure not the car mechanic down the road – Ed Heal Sep 13 '14 at 8:18
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    Its just a matter of increasing the projects bus number (the number of people killed by a bus before you are in trouble). If the bus number is 1 then the project is an dicey ground. Even if does get to your skill level it will take him years (it took you years) and why would he take the pay cut to go from his position to yours. Also you will find that by teaching others you significantly improve your own skills (as you need to know more in order to teach it). – Martin York Sep 13 '14 at 18:17
  • If you "can't afford" to lose your job, then you'd be well advised to quickly learn that your employer employs you to do what they need done. Your little demarcation dispute about whether or not a manager who hasn't paid for four years of school should be allowed to do web development is an excellent way to make your employer want to replace you. – Carson63000 Sep 14 '14 at 6:59
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I decided that I wasn't being paid what I was worth and started looking for another job. I found a position that offered me $30K more with exactly the same description of what I was currently doing.

I liked the company I was working at but I wanted to be paid what I was worth. told my manager, who is also the CEO, that I received an offer for much more but that I wanted to stay at his company.

So basically, you told your company that you might have left if they didn't give you more money.

At that point any smart CEO would think "I need to make sure I have a replacement ready for when David decides he still wants more."

My supervisor, who manages the IT team department has started to take interest in web developing. He wants me to start teaching him everything I've done.

I feel very uncomfortable teaching him everything. I paid for four years of school and still paying. It doesn't seem fair.

By that logic, nobody could ever learn anything on the job. You would stay in your current position forever, since everything you might need to learn has been paid for by someone else.

To me, it seems like the start of getting rid of me.

If they wanted to be rid of you, you'd probably already be gone. Everyone is replaceable.

I'm tempted to just confront him and say that I feel threatened by his interest in my projects. I can't afford to lose my job. The company is looking for its self interest. I am too. Should I confront my supervisor or go straight to my manager? Should I tell him that I feel like they are trying to get rid of me? I need advice.

No, you shouldn't tell your supervisor (or your manager, or the CEO) how you feel. You may well come across as confused, inexperienced, and paranoid.

Almost certainly your manager and the CEO already know that your supervisor is attempting to increase his skill level. It's likely that they told him to do so.

If you aren't ever going to be willing to help train others, your career will be limited.

I'm assuming that you are young, this is your first job out of school, and that you have a lot to learn. You need to understand that this is how business works, that everyone can be replaced, and that hoarding your (self paid or otherwise) knowledge isn't going to change that.

Rather than being known as "the guy who is afraid to help others", you might instead try to be known as "the guy who helps make the entire company better". I know which of the two I'd rather work with. And as a Director, I know which of the two I'd help move far up in the company.

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    Thank you for the detailed response. I appreciate it and I know now what I must do. – david choi Sep 13 '14 at 16:51
  • I agree that everyone is replaceable, but plenty of companies do covert "knowledge transfer" before they let an employee go. Seen/heard that plenty of times. I would encourage David to make a Plan B as well. – mcknz Sep 14 '14 at 21:17
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Your question about raise and that you can have other offers easily maybe made your boss think that if you by any reason quit, someone needs to keep the shop running until a replacement is found. It's called risk mitigation.

If you insist to keep your work secret to your own company to protect your job, then I can assure you that any decent manager want to replace you as soon as they can with someone that is easier to work with.

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Your supervisor is... supervising you. He has every right to take an interest in your projects, and you have no right to keep everything to yourself just because you "can't afford to lose your job". Everything you do on the workplace belongs to the company, not to you.

The attitude I usually take at each job I work in is that if I've shared enough information such that they do not depend on me and I am completely replaceable, then I've done a good job.

Trying to keep everything to yourself to hold onto your job won't get you far. You should feel flattered that you have the opportunity to be a reference point for your company in your particular field.

  • Good point. But why have an interest now? After 2 years. It's easy to find a replacement that can easily pick up where I left off. – david choi Sep 13 '14 at 7:50
  • It may simply be an interest in personal growth or a desire to know more about what you do in order to be a better manager. If you're doing a good job then there should be no way that your manager will be able to replace you after just a few months training and self-teaching. – Alpar Sep 13 '14 at 9:15
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    @davidchoi Why now? Probably because your demand for a 60% pay rise reminded them just how dangerous it is to rely on a single individual for a critical business function. – Carson63000 Sep 14 '14 at 7:01
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Here is an idea.

Just enable anybody to be able to take over your job if you get knocked over by the bus.

But if you are good at your job then that bus will never arrive.

One could conclude that your are not particularly good at you job, so keeping secrets is job security.

Perhaps the boss has spotted this?!

Or perhaps he wants you to move on in the company and be able to supervise your replacement.

Or he is just curious

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