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I am working for a big MNC. I am not satisfied with my current work, salary, designation. Hence I applied for an internal position.

I am selected for this internal position and possibly I would get promotion and salary hike. This opportunity is now waiting on me to inform my manager to take the offer process forward.

But to my dismay, I got a call from the HR of another great company saying that they are going to start processing my offer which was on hold for 3 months. This offer is good and is in my hometown. (Much awaited offer) But I have not yet received the offer letter. Offer processing may take one more month.

What should I do now? Decline the internal offer right away without my current manager even becoming aware of it? Get the internal offer and later decline it?

closed as off-topic by The Wandering Dev Manager, Carson63000, gnat, Jan Doggen, Michael Grubey Oct 7 '14 at 10:47

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Until the HR of that other company comes through, you've got nothing but the offer you have in hand. And who knows what the HR of that company might decide at the last minute.

While your stay at the new position may be short, you should strive to be the competent, capable individual that you are and that the confidence they placed in you when they made the offer is totally justified by your performance. At the very least, you want to give them some good memories of you and build a reservoir of good will.

Let's assume that the offer from the HR of that other company comes through. you still need to review the offer and make the determination that it is acceptable.

And if you find that offer acceptable and you are reasonably confident that you are not stepping into a lions' den, then you are resigning from your position for a personal reason - the job is close to home, a reason which you should emphasize has nothing to do with the way you are treated.

It is possible that if you take the offer in hand, you find out the hard way that you are not happy there. Which should make it easier for you to take up that long awaited offer, if and when it comes through.

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If you haven't already, you should spend some time analyzing the two options. If both choices are on the table, which one would you prefer?

It sounds you're in a strong position to negotiate. Go to whichever party gave you the second-best offer and tell them you've verbally received a better offer from another company. Explain to them why you consider the other offer to be better. Then, assuming it's possible, tell them what they could do to match or beat the other offer -- is it salary, title, interesting work, start date, vacation time, etc? (This could be a way to pressure the outside company to process the offer faster.) Avoid sounding like a hardball negotiator; be polite by using words such as "I'd love to work for you, but I just can't turn down Company B when they're offering me X, Y, and Z."

Then they'll choose if they want to up their offer. If they don't change their offer, go with the company that had the better offer. If they do change their offer, do a fresh analysis. Is it now the better offer? If so, play the game once again with the other company.

You have no reason to coy about your job search activities with either hiring manager. A company that puts your offer on hold for 3 months can't expect you to just be sitting on your hands. And, for the other side, how could you have predicted when or if that company would ever get back to you about the offer on hold?

  • The problem is that the internal offer would be given only after my current manager is notified. So if I opt to receive internal offer, I would already get a bad name in my current team for a position for which I would never join (Now that company B came back after hold). – Jazzie Oct 7 '14 at 7:31

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