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What questions can I ask at my interview when applying for the job I already do?

The position is a temporary one at the moment which I have been doing for just over a year now, however the position is now being advertised as a permanent one and I am going to apply.

I would just like to ask some questions at the interview to help make me stand out. Even though it would probably be a slap in the face if I didn't get the job as it would seem I haven't been doing a good enough job for them to keep extending my contract ;-(

closed as too broad by gnat, enderland Oct 15 '14 at 11:20

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    "Your questions should be reasonably scoped... avoid asking subjective questions where … every answer is equally valid..." (help center) – gnat Oct 15 '14 at 8:54
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What questions can I ask at my interview when applying for the job I already do?

Ask questions that you do not know the answer to.

  • What kind of projects would one expect to be doing in a few months time in that position?
  • Are there any expected changes in the role or responsibilities of that position?
  • How would your employee like things to be done vs. how they were done earlier?

I would just like to ask some questions at the interview to help make me stand out.

You already stand out; you've been fulfilling the responsibilities of that position already and you should make them see that, they will probably ask you why you deserve that position and you should simply tell them what you've learned and how that will be of good use to them if you get the position.

Asking smart-ass or non-relative questions might be too obvious and isn't going to get you far unless it's really relative and of your interest. Think about questions which answers will actually help you becoming better at that position.

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I always like to ask how I compare to the other applicants, so that I can find out where my weaknesses lie (for future reference). I invariably ask about their remote work policies. And as mentioned in Jonast92's answer, it's a good idea to ask what kind of tasks you are expected to do in the first few months - and also what kind of results they want from a successful worker.

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