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I heard a story about someone who got a health care job but lost the job before she started it because she shared about getting the job on social media. Do companies usually tell applicants not to share on social media before they enforce such a policy or do they enforce that policy without warning?

closed as off-topic by Jim G., gnat, Jan Doggen, yochannah, IDrinkandIKnowThings Nov 4 '14 at 15:57

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There is neither a common policy nor any reason or "cause" to fire someone over a "I got a new job with ACME corp, that's so great!"-facebook post.

You should read the story and the details behind it very carefully.

What is cause for termination in most countries is actually publicly talking bad about your company. So if someone posted "I have to work at ACME corp, they suck so bad and I'm sure my new boss is personally clubbing baby seals and eating kittens" then yes... that would probably lead to a termination of the contract. But then, maybe it's better for both of them to not work together.

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    Another reason for termination is for revealing details about the job. The guy in this article was fired for talking about an unreleased product, and the article notes that the NDA he signed was for talking about any part of the training or job. – Conor Nov 4 '14 at 14:50
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Do company's usually tell applicants not to share on social media before they enforce such a policy or do they enforce that policy without warning?

Most companies don't want to fire people. They want employees to succeed and be around for the long term. Hiring and training new employees is typically far more expensive than retaining them.

If something is important enough to be a fireable offense, most companies either make it explicitly known, or consider it common knowledge.

For example, if a company would fire you for using social media, they would likely make it clear what you can and cannot do regarding social media.

On the other hand, most companies assume you know that stealing company property or publicly trashing your employer is grounds for immediate dismissal.

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Do companies usually tell applicants not to share on social media before they enforce such a policy or do they enforce that policy without warning?

Yes, termination for failure to comply with some policy can only be done if the policy has been effectively communicated. You can't fire someone for a policy they cannot reasonably be known to exist.

On the other hand, the person is not hired until they actually start, so, in this case, they probably were not so much 'fired', as 'not hired', or, put another way, their job offer was 'withdrawn before the hiring happened'.

Still, even then, it is common practice for companies to hire on 'probation' for a limited length of time (a month or three), wherein the employment can be terminated with no reason given at all.

There's so much that could have happened here, that it's not worth speculating on. The fact that she posted to facebook may have led someone to see she was 'liked' by someone else, and that someone else was the problem. You cannot assume that the facebook post itself was the cause.

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