-2

So I'm in the final year of my degree and I'm looking into jobs in robotics. It seems like the vast majority of them need knowledge of c++ which I don't currently have. Furthermore, so far all the jobs involving c++ I have seen so far require experience with it.

This seems like an impossible situation to me - can't get experience without experience. Is the only option really just taking a gap year or something after graduation to spend time learning the language?

closed as off-topic by Jim G., gnat, Jan Doggen, yochannah, Michael Grubey Nov 12 '14 at 17:56

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – Jim G., gnat, Jan Doggen, yochannah, Michael Grubey
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
  • 2
    You've got at least half a year. You could assign yourself homework and start practicing... Or consider going into another field for a while that will give you more time to develop C++ skills (and who knows, you might decide that you like that field as much as robotics). Finally, remember that jobs which say they want experience in a particular may settle for someone who has proven skill in other languages which are structurally similar. (If you've worked in C and in Java, you can sorta average the two and have the general concept of C++, though there's a lot of detail to learn.) – keshlam Nov 12 '14 at 0:41
  • 5
    And remember that anyone hiring right out of college KNOWS you don't have much job experience yet. – keshlam Nov 12 '14 at 0:42
  • what is your degree? why hasn't it exposed you to C++ if it is a suitable subject for getting into robotics? what languages has it exposed you to? – HorusKol Nov 12 '14 at 1:44
  • Take a course. Maybe online. Maybe free. – Jan Doggen Nov 12 '14 at 13:39
2

Learn it in your free time, each around a week:

  • Data types and functions
  • Classes and Objects
  • Algorithms, iterate and sort lists

This should get you covered for interviews and understanding code.

Then look into robotics, what are common tasks there, what algorithms are used, is there a cheap robot to test stuff on, then try to solve a task like fetch your newspaper with it. You'll probably fail, but learn a lot.

Imagine taking 3-4 courses (basics to robotics) at university, but condensing them in a shorter timeframe and teaching yourself from books or blogs. That's what work life later will be anyway.

Usually when switching languages or technology, you have around 1-3 months in a company until you are expected to deliver working code. Not in depth, but good enough to know where to find answers.

2

Learn the skills

If you don't have any skills with C/C++, then most likely you're not ready for such jobs, and for most companies you shouldn't expect to learn the basics on the job - there would be enough product-specific things to learn, so they generally require general basic skills as a prerequisite.

Languages are easy

That being said, gaining some proficiency in a language doesn't require that much time. It's often assumed that students in 3-4 year comp-sci programs will graduate already knowing multiple programming languages along with everything else they're doing, so 1 new language per year is possible as a side-effect of general learning. Getting up to speed in a new language is something that a qualified programmer should be able to do on their own within a couple months - the first project working in an unknown language would take more time, and that's it.

If it's your final year, you should be able to learn some C++ and build some trial projects before graduation, as a side-project along your other classes. Alternatively, it's something that should be doable in half a year while working in an unrelated programming job. If you feel that you would need to spend a whole gap year purely on that, then that's not a good sign about your capabilities (or self-esteem).

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.