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I'm sure there are many opinion on this situation...

I recently accepted a job offer at company B, about a week ago. I went to resign at company A and they countered. At company A my role is currently ending, and company A says they have plans to transition me into another project. I knew about this, however I needed a change immediately and decided to accept another job offer. Well, when I tried to put in my two weeks, they countered with the same transition plan this time faster and with more money and a career plan. Given the hideous amount of student loans I have I decided this is a much better offer, and I would like to stay. I requested they put it in a contract, and I am still waiting on the contract a week after I accepted an offer from company B.

Now I feel horrible for company B because I may be rescinding my acceptance about a week before my start date. Is it unprofessional to rescind a job offer acceptance?

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    You will burn a bridge, there's no getting around that. It's not the most terrible thing to do.
    – NotMe
    Nov 13, 2014 at 14:52
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    possible duplicate of Leaving a job very early to accept another offer Nov 13, 2014 at 15:13
  • Get this...Company A just lowered their counter today and changed the job title from what they told me they would promote me to. This definitely changes everything. Would you bail?
    – Siah
    Nov 14, 2014 at 20:53

1 Answer 1

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Make sure that you have the paperwork from A in hand, and notify B ASAP. Thank them for their time and state that you would have gone with B if A hadn't pulled all the stops and quickly made you a very strong offer. Apologize for any inconvenience and express the hope that you and company B wil be talking at some point in the future, because your interview experience with Company B gave you a strong, good impression of Company B.

Don't worry too much about company B - they'll just get the next candidate on their list. It's much better for Company B that you decline before your official start date than you show up and give your resignation in person on the day you start. And showing up on the day you start to hand in your resignation might be more than a little awkward for you. And you'll more likely than not look like a jerk.

As your last of piece of unfinished business, make a point of thanking the person who referred you to Company B. Yes, you decided to stay with A but thanks to that person, you got to know Company B and Company B is indeed a good company :)

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  • Thanks, this is really comforting and helpful. I just hate to leave company B in the dirt like that, because I really did seriously consider them. I am definitely waiting on the paperwork from A so I am sure this is going to happen.
    – Siah
    Nov 13, 2014 at 15:24
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    @Siah The minute you get that paperwork from A and kick it in, zoom an email to B. Don't string B along a minute more than necessary. Nov 13, 2014 at 15:26
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    @Siah it's very likely company B won't consider you in the future over this, but if you follow Vietnhi's advice you at least make it possible they might consider you in the future. (Really depends on their hiring process and the personalities of those involved) Nov 13, 2014 at 15:53
  • Yeah I really liked them as a company and the team seemed to be great. I will definitely emphasize that they left a lasting impression on me.
    – Siah
    Nov 13, 2014 at 16:05
  • Get this...Company A just lowered their counter today and changed the job title from what they told me they would promote me to. This definitely changes everything. Would you bail?
    – Siah
    Nov 14, 2014 at 20:54

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