9

I have been searching for a new job for about three months. I had a fantastic interview about a month ago with a place that I really, really would like to work for. It all went very well. But they seem to move incredibly slowly when it comes to this kind of thing. I've communicated with them since then, and the selection/hiring process is moving along as it ought to be. They're just taking their sweet time. Meanwhile, I've gone through the entire process of two other companies, one of which is going to give me the final interview next week and (assuming all goes well) make me an offer. A very good and attractive offer, too, one that would be a big step forward for my career.

I really want to work for the first place. They have the environment that I want, the culture that I want to be a part of, and some fringe benefits that I can't get many other places. But I can't just blow off every other opportunity and assume they're going to give me the job. I followed up with them once again today, and they simply said:

I should be able to give you more information next week. Thanks!

They're genuinely not trying to be rude or impolite. But how I can impress upon them that I actually need an answer without being rude, impolite, or improper in return? I already mentioned in an email to them two weeks ago that I had to know because I was pursuing other opportunities:

I just wanted to follow up on the position that I interviewed for two weeks ago. I've got a couple other applications and interviews in the works, so the status of your position greatly affects how I move forward at this point.

I'm not sure what to do in this situation. I'm about 80-90% certain that if I just wait it out they will offer me the job. But I can't just stop looking and shoot down other potential opportunities without the certainty. What else can I do? I really want to say something along the lines of, "Look, I genuinely want to work for you, but I can't wait around forever and you're about to lose me." But obviously I can't, and I wouldn't want to deliver that kind of threat/ultimatum to them since they're not just another option or a leverage point for me; they're where I'd like to end up, if all goes right in the world.

I've got nothin'.

  • I wasn't quite sure how to phrase the question succinctly in the title, so if you have a better alternative, feel free to edit it. – asteri Nov 13 '14 at 16:54
  • Could you elaborate on "obviously"? After 2 prior contacts, I would likely resort to such a direct approach. – Telastyn Nov 13 '14 at 16:59
  • Are the other offers good? Would you be content in the other companies? – Sigal Shaharabani Nov 13 '14 at 16:59
  • @Telastyn Maybe you're right. Maybe it's not so obvious that that isn't the right thing to do. – asteri Nov 13 '14 at 17:10
  • @SigalShaharabani The offers are very good. But no, I wouldn't be content there, I don't think. – asteri Nov 13 '14 at 17:10
23

Based on your response, you are still being indirect. If you really like the first place, you should put your cards clearly on the table:

You have another offer and need to respond within a week. You would prefer working for them instead of taking that offer but are not in a position to turn them down without a counter offer.

This is information I appreciate having when considering a candidate. A slow recruiting process can be for any number of reasons. Knowing that the window to hire you is closing can help them accelerate it if you really are their top candidate. If you are not, they may encourage you to take the other offer and shift their attention elsewhere.

  • Well, this is what I went with. I think you're right. At some point you have to just lay it down and be done with it. – asteri Nov 13 '14 at 20:12
2

Are you certain they agree that you "had a fantastic interview"? Have they told you that?

If they really want you, they would be doing something about it. You don't indicate here, but has anyone in the process actually told you they are interested in hiring you? Might not be in the form of an offer yet, because of internal procedures, but they should have at least said something.

In my experience, as a candidate and as a hiring manager, "I should be able to give you more information next week. Thanks!" is HR speak for you haven't been eliminated yet, but we are still looking for a better candidate.

  • Good point. The hiring manager told me that they really liked me, but I suppose they could have been lying. – asteri Nov 13 '14 at 17:09
  • 1
    Maybe not lying :) They like you, just not quite enough to hire you. Part of their job is to keep you interested if you are near the top of the list. The old saying holds true, though, actions speak louder than words. – cdkMoose Nov 13 '14 at 17:14
  • If they weren't interested in hiring the OP, they would just say so. Or say "we'll keep you in mind for future openings". I've gotten that response in the past. There's no point in stringing the OP along. – DaveG Mar 22 at 13:51
1

Contact the company of your first choice and ask if there is anyway you can get an answer on or before a given date. Unless they ask, don't tell them you have another offer. They may assume it. You're not trying to give an ultimatum. If they can't, just thank them and hope to hear from them as soon as possible. You never know until you have an offer, so keep your options open.

0

The rule is that you continue looking for other positions, sending in CVs, going to interviews, and evaluating any offers that you get, until you have a signed contract.

If you have another offer then it is time to contact the first company, see how interested they really are, and tell them that you need an offer or you will start elsewhere. That's when you find out if they really wanted you, or if they were dragging things out because maybe you were the second choice and they were waiting for the first choice to respond, or maybe because someone really wants to hire you but has no funding.

Obviously until you get other offers there is no need to do anything.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.